Home GO_Ms_No:68

NOTIFICATION

A P COMMUN ITY FOREST MANAGEMENT PROJECT

RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN (RAP)

__________________________________________________________________________

RESETTLEMENT AND REHABILITATION POLICY FOR THE PROJECT

 AFFECTED PERSONS

 

1 Background:

 

 1.1

 

 

Forests in the state of Andhra Pradesh extend to nearly 23% of its geographical area. These forests are rich in a variety of flora and fauna. They also are abode to a number of tribal groups. The tribals depend heavily on the richness of the forest resources for their livelihood. Unfortunately, development of forest resources and development of human resources have not always been very synergetic leading to large scale degradation of forest resources. The reasons range from unsustainable and unscientific exploitation to increase in demand primarily due to population growth and inadequacy of a corresponding growth in supply of goods and services from the forests.

 

            During 1990s,the Government of India (GOI) issued a circular enabling community participation in Forest Protection and Management. The Government of Andhra Pradesh (GOAP) adopted this in 1992. From then onwards there has been a major shift in Forest Management.  The local village communities that depend on the forests for meeting their needs were made partners in Forest Management through the concept of Joint Forest Management (JFM). The experience of JFM in AP has proven to be a success. The forest cover has increased and there is a perceptible improvement in the forestry sector. However, the investments made and initiatives taken need further consolidation for sustaining the impact. With the experience gained from Joint Forest Management, in order to institutionalize the process, to ensure greater decentralization and devolution of managerial responsibilities and to ensure steady flow of benefits to the communities, during 2002, the Government of Andhra Pradesh launched Community Forest Management as an improvement over Joint Forest Management. While JFM was a partnership between the forest dependent communities and the GOAP, CFM is a democratic process through delegation of the decision making process. It aims at decentralizing the entire process of planning and implementation with Andhra Pradesh Forest Department (APFD ) and GOAP acting as facilitators and providers of technical and infrastructure support. This Community Forest Management approach is a radical shift from traditional estate approach to forestry.

 

Joint Forest Management and Community Forest Management primarily focus on treating forests as a common property resource and managing it for common use. Community Forest Management in Andhra Pradesh is being practiced only in the state owned forest areas. Vana Samrakshana Samithies or Village Forest Protection Committees are formed in the forest dependent villages comprising of willing forest dependent families. Forests in the vicinity of such villages are then allotted to these VSSs for protection and management. The VSSs are entitled for complete ownership of usufruct and are required to set apart 50% of net proceeds from sale of timber and bamboos towards future forest management expenses.

 

 

2. Need for a Resettlement Action Plan in Community Forest Management:

 

2.1 Land tenure in Tribal areas: Tribals, especially in the north coastal (Srikakulam, Vizianagaram, Visakhapatnam and East Godavari) and north Telangana (Adilabad, Khammam, Karimnagar and Warangal) districts traditionally practiced shifting cultivation. The cycle of cropping , other details of agriculture and different social practices were regulated through a well-defined and structured system of local governance, which is similar to the panchayat system at village level.  The practice of shifting cultivation, though not environment friendly, did not cause great loss as long as the population was less and the cycle of shifting had wide gaps. The cycle however gradually started reducing with the growth in local population. The state’s policy on reservation of forested areas for forestry purposes affected the tribals’ dependency on forest for their livelihood as their access to forest for cultivating crop decreased considerably. To provide land to tribals and to settle the land tenure, the Government took a number of measures such as abolition of private estates, conversion of muttadari and mahalguzari rights into Ryotwari rights.  Dis-reservation of forest lands was also done in some cases to assign land to tribal agriculturists. But the policy of dis-reservation of forests and converting the land-use from forestry to agriculture resulted in encroachments. The initiatives in the 60s and mid 70s which accorded tribal status to the community of lambadas led to their migration to Adilabad district from Maharashtra, where they did not enjoy such a status . Similar migration took place from Orissa into the neighboring Visakhapatnam district around the same time where tribals displaced by Hydel projects migrated to Andhra Pradesh in search of land and employment.

           

Since mid 80s, the law and order situation especially in the tribal areas of Andhra Pradesh has deteriorated with increase in activities of extremists (locally called Naxalites) and anti-social elements . Many times the Forest Officers were reduced to being mute spectators to large scale plundering of forests that took place. In1987 the situation was so bad that in an ambush, many senior police officials were killed in Alampalli in Adilabad district. This attracted the attention of the Government. Various incidents clearly pointed out that land in general and forestland in particular was the major issue for tribal unrest, which was exploited by the extremist elements and that this was also the reason attributed for the ambush. A decision was taken in November 1987 to identify all the encroachments that existed prior to 1980 for considering their de-reservation. (the cut off date being the date on which the Government of India had passed the Indian Forest Conservation Act according to which no forest land was to be diverted for non forestry activity without the prior approval of the Government of India). This further encouraged more encroachments. It is estimated that nearly 100,000 ha of forestland was encroached consequent to this  decision of the Government to consider de-reservation of pre 1980 cultivations.  After nearly seven years from the cut off date, the  virtually impossibility of making any distinction between pre 1980 and post 1980 encroachments, and the worsening law and order situation added to the misery of foresters. Realizing the potential ill effects of such large-scale encroachments, the Government subsequently in 1995 withdrew its decision of 1987 to consider regularizing pre 1980 cultivations.  In this entire bargain nearly 25% of forestland was encroached in Adilabad district itself. 

 

Efforts made by the Government to evict the encroachments by treating the encroachers as lawbreakers and dealing with them by invoking punitive measures under the AP Forest Act 1967 did not yield any positive results. On the contrary, such measures resulted in a situation of conflicts and tensions among the foresters and villagers. The community of foresters lost public sympathy and were persona non-grata in Tribal areas. However with the advent of Joint Forest Management since mid 90s, there is a greater harmony between foresters and tribals. There is also reduction in fresh encroachments as the livelihood issues of the forest dependent communities are addressed. Sincere efforts were made to educate the tribals of ill effects of destroying forests and on unscientific and unsustainable cultivation of food crops. Concept of  declining crop productivity; decreasing soil fertility; enhancement of soil erosion etc were also explained. By providing viable alternatives during the implementation of Joint Forest Management nearly 37000 ha of forestland under possession and cultivation of local people have been reclaimed through afforestation and  put under productive tree crops through VSS . However the above data is only an estimation, village and family specific data will have to be gathered during the course of site specific planning through the process of microplanning. Thus persuasion and motivation coupled with education have yielded positive results that could not be achieved through coercion.

 

2.2 All the VSSs have been allotted forest areas for protection and development. No new land acquisition is envisaged during the implementation of A P Community Forest Management Project. Further, no physical displacement is expected during the period of A P Community Forest Management Project. However, the main issue in CFM will remain utilization of land in the forest areas for agriculture purpose. There is a likelihood of some adverse effects or impacts on some families and individuals as they may lose their individual occupancy of land in the forests to the collective management of VSS and which could  result in the loss of their livelihood source. It is likely that the families cultivating such forestlands individually might voluntarily surrender them to the VSS for Community Forest Management. In order to mitigate the adverse effects in such cases, there is a need to prepare a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP). Accordingly this Resettlement Action Plan has been prepared covering all the VSSs in Andhra Pradesh that are implementing A P Community Forest Management Project. It also addresses the issue of loss of livelihood that might have occurred during implementation of Joint Forest Management activity. The main objective of this RAP is to describe the process of resettlement of people dependent on forest land that will be undertaken adopting the R& R Policy (Attachment 1) without limiting it to any single project. This RAP covers the entire state with tentative estimates having been derived from the Social and Environmental Assessment (SEA) taken up during the course of preparation of A P Community Forest Management Project for seeking financial support from the World Bank. Final assessment and figures will, however, change as the VSS communities prepare RAPs for individual VSS areas during the process of microplanning.

 

2.3 Revision to RAP: This Resettlement Action Plan is a revised version of the Resettlement Action Plan that was prepared during 2002 for the A P Community Forest Management Project as per the R&R Policy of the GOAP issued in G.O. Ms No. 10 EFS&T (For III) Dept. Dt. 5.2.2002. Revision of this plan was necessitated to address objections raised by some NGOs. During Project negotiation it was agreed that this RAP would be revised in consultation with the stakeholders. The present RAP has been done after detailed consultations with all the stakeholders including potential affected people and local NGOs. This revision makes the approach applicable to JFM phase and clarifies certain expressions that were made in the earlier version on voluntary nature of surrender of encroached forestland This revision is also in accordance with the agreement reached with the World Bank during project negotiation in May 2002. It facilitates extending rehabilitation package to the affected families either on individual basis or on group basis depending on choice of the affected families and viability of the economic activity planned for rehabilitation.

  

2.4 The present Resettlement Action Plan has been prepared to enable smooth implementation of the R&R Policy issued by the Government of Andhra Pradesh in respect of the Vana Samrakshana Samithies supported under the A P Community Forest Management Project. It also covers the Vana Samrakshana Samithies that were supported under the earlier World Bank aided A P Forestry Project where similar reclamation of land was done.   

3. Process of social assessment

 

3.1 In order to assess the likely impacts due to the interventions, a Social Impact Assessment was carried out as part of the over all Social and Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the A P Community Forest Management Project. The SEA was carried out in a sample of 20 VSS areas representing different agro-climatic zones and socio-economic features of the state. Besides using different tools of observation, the study also carried out a census of potentially affected families and studied their dependence on land required for the project interventions.

 

3.2 Assessment of impacts: As an integral part of the SEA, a 20 sample VSS areas were visited to assess the types of likely impacts due to the proposed interventions, extent of impact on the livelihood of those dependent on land and the size of the population that may be affected. Discussions were also held on how to deal with encroachments, and what type of support would be required to help those affected to restore their livelihood. An attempt was made to identify all encroachments in the VSS areas. This involved detailed discussions with village elders and knowledgeable persons about the history of encroachment, families dependency on forest lands and the extent of their dependence. Discussions were also held with village level government officials particularly from forest and revenue departments. Detailed consultations were also held with local Panchayat representatives. Participatory mapping was undertaken to identify the VSS area, families cultivating such lands and the families likely to be affected. Discussions also focused on the entitlement framework required to mitigate adverse impacts of the CFM.

 

3.3  The information thus collected provided the basis for developing a broad entitlement framework, which was further discussed during the stakeholders consultation workshops held at regional and state levels. Besides the general social assessment, a census of families dependent on VSS forest areas was undertaken in each of the 20 VSSs covered under the SEA. Apart from individual interviews with the members of affected families, detailed discussions were held focusing on entitlement framework and plans to mitigate potential adverse impacts. Individual interviews were also held with members of  families that were likely to be affected to assess the extent of impact of the project on their socio-economic status.  Attempts were also made to assess the vulnerability of these encroachers particularly on their dependence on such encroached lands for their livelihood. Information collected from these 20 VSS areas is used as the base for preparing the Resettlement Action Plan.

 

3.4  Consultation for RAP revision: As part of revision of this RAP, during the months of April to August 2003, further detailed consultations were held with stakeholders including the families affected or likely to be affected due to implementation of CFM. Details of the issues that emerged are attached (Annex I) and revisions effected in R&R policy can be seen in Annex II.

 

3.5           Consultation with the local VSS community including potentially affected people will form an important part of project implementation, VSS facilitated by NGOs/Community Organizer (CO) will also carry out the process of Social Impact Assessment (SIA) as part of site specific planning. This process of social impact assessment will be a part of preparing Micro level plans at the VSS level.

 

 

 

 

4. Benefits from Community Forest Management

 

4.1 Community Forest Management aims at reduction in rural poverty through improved forest management with community participation and increased access to forest resources. It : (i) directly targets the poor to reduce vulnerability and improve livelihoods with significant asset transfers; (ii) expands the involvement of poor in economic activities by improving access as well as profits from the sale of wood and non-timber forest products (NTFP); and (iii) enhances economic opportunities for women and other vulnerable groups with targeted training and income earning opportunities. The most immediate benefits would flow to tribals, landless poor and other forest dependent communities in the VSS areas. It will also help the communities in improving their village infrastructure and livelihood opportunities through forest as well as non-forest based income generation activities.  Periodic thinning and harvest of timber, poles and other small wood will provide the community funds for financing local development works and needs as provided through G O Ms. No. 13 EFS&T (For III) Department Dt. 12.2.2002. 

 

5. Impacts

 

The interventions of Community Forest Management broadly include restoring degraded forest resources and to make them more productive. Under CFM, VSS communities will be empowered to plan and implement all activities. SEA carried out in 20 VSS areas revealed that CFM did not involve any physical displacement of the population nor did it involve any new acquisition of land and structures for project interventions. However, the major issue is encroachments of forest lands allotted to VSS communities. Not all the VSS areas in the state have this problem of encroachment in forest areas, but the  issue is of significance in the northern coastal areas (Visakhapatnam, Srikakulam and Vizianagaram) and northern part of Telangana (Adilabad and Khammam) and some parts of Rayalaseema region in the state (see Annex I for the distribution of VSS covered under the SEA). Of the 20 VSS areas covered under the SEA, in 8 VSS areas encroachment of forest areas assigned to VSS was seen.  In these 8 VSS areas, encroachment was reported mainly for agricultural purposes.

 

6. Identifying affected area and minimizing adverse impacts

 

6.1 During the process of social assessment, the SEA team was accompanied by the staff of Forest and Revenue Departments. Involving village elders, forest maps were consulted  to identify the forest area allotted to VSS. Once the VSS area was marked on the forest map, area under encroachment was identified. This helped to identify the project-affected families. Ground level identification of the affected area was carried out involving the local community to identify the extent of individual encroachments and families encroaching them. The results of the SEA and subsequent census survey of affected families in 20 VSS areas provided the base to extrapolate the number of families affected and develop this RAP.

 

6.2 This RAP does not contemplate use of force in its implementation . All adversely affected families (see section 9.3.4 on entitlement framework) will get support to mitigate their losses. 

 

6.3 The data on encroachments of forestlands in 20 VSS areas covered under SEA is presented in Table 1. As may be seen from the data, only 8 VSS areas have reported encroachments.  In these 8 VSS areas, there are 172 encroachments and the number varies between 9 in Moolaboddavaram to 39 in Nizampet. VSS areas with large number of encroachers are in northern coastal districts.   The total forestland reported to have been encroached in the eight VSS areas is 213.68 ha which gives an average encroachment of 1.24 ha per family . In Gandhinagaram VSS (in Visakhapatnam district), the average area encroached by a family is as high as 1.95 ha (4.9 acres) while the lowest average of 0.26 ha (0.6 acre) is found in Kanchenapalli VSS (in Medak district). The issue of encroachments in VSS areas and their rehabilitation is of serious nature, threatening the livelihood of some of the families dependent on such encroached lands. It is worthwhile to point out here that the encroachment referred to in this document refer to forestlands allotted to VSS and include areas under podu cultivation practiced within VSS boundaries.  In terms of eligibility for R&R support, all those families who have been in occupation of forest land allotted to VSS at the time of its constitution will be entitled to receive R&R assistance.  

 

  Table 1:  Encroachers and extent of encroachment

 

VSS reporting encroachment

No. of encroachers

Area (in ha) encroached

Av. area encroached (ha)

Tittingvalasa

30

13.48

0.45

Moolaboddaru

9

7.50

0.83

Gandhinagram

6

11.70

1.95

Meduru I

32

59.50

1.86

Chekkapuram

10

7.50

0.75

Kanchenpalli

20

5.20

0.26

Mohammadnagar

26

44.80

1.72

Nizampet

39

64.00

1.64

Total

172

213.68

1.248


                        Source: Social and Environmental Assessment, 2001.

6.4  All families encroaching forest lands in VSS areas are not impacted uniformly. The R&R policy provides for varying levels of support depending upon the type and extent of loss. Of the 172 encroachments found in 8 VSS areas covered under SEA, 60 encroachers do not have any land under cultivation other than that encroached in VSS areas. In other words, these affected families are landless and are by and large dependent on encroached lands for their livelihood. 

 

Table 2: Land ownership among PAFs (SEA results)

 

VSS area

PAFs with land outside VSS area

PAFs totally dependent on encroached land

Total PAFs

Tittingvalasa

28

2

30

Moolaboddaru

1

8

9

Gandhinagram

0

6

6

Meduru I

0

32

32

Chekkapuram

10

0

10

Kanchenpalli

19

1

20

Mohammadnagar

23

3

26

Nizampet

31

8

39

Total

112

60

172

Source: Social and Environmental Assessment, 2001.

6.5  Estimates have been developed based on the findings of SEA in each of the agro-forestry zones of the state. These estimates are presented in Table 3. These estimates indicate that about 28% of the families are likely to be affected, as they are largely dependent on encroached lands for meeting their household food requirements. These estimates will get  updated during project implementation when social assessment would be undertaken at the individual VSS level as part of preparing microplans to identify affected families and prepare VSS level RAPs.

 

6.6  During the detailed consultation with the stakeholders undertaken as part of revising RAP between April and August 2003, it was observed that among the affected families who participated in the consultation meetings, 37.57 % depended exclusively on forest land that they had encroached, 22.18 % had land outside VSS areas in addition forest lands encroached by them that are included in the VSS areas, 0.59 % were likely to lose houses and 39.66 % were head loaders.

 

6.7  Learning from the experiences and responses at the stakeholders’ meetings, it has been recognized that (i) majority of the families who encroached forest land in Telangana and Rayalaseema regions will resist surrendering land to VSS and may not even allow agro-forestry in such areas and (ii) significant proportion of encroachers in North coastal Andhra may also not surrender their encroached land to VSS but may agree for agro-forestry with agreement on equitable (they may even demand higher) share of produce. Therefore, only those individuals who are willing to surrender their encroached forest land voluntarily to VSS will be eligible to get support through R&R Policy (Attachment 1). 

 

7.  Profile of the affected community:

 

7.1 A profile of the encroachers, in terms of their social structure, family size, working members, landholding outside VSS, encroached forest lands in the VSS area, operational holding, household income and income from encroached land is presented in Annex I.  Expectedly, STs account for more than four-fifths of the total encroachers so far identified. The total population of the 172 families encroaching VSS land is 838, indicating an average family size of 4.9 members per family. An average of 2.6 members per family are engaged in some economic activity or the others and hence are workers and contribute to the household income. Illiteracy is still a predominant factor for the backwardness of the encroaching families. 13 families among the encroachers have landholding of more than 2 ha. Small and marginal farmers account for 61.60 % of the encroachers in VSS areas. Landless among the encroachers account for nearly 30.80 % of the families encroaching forest land. There are hardly any irrigation sources in VSS villages and therefore, cultivation is predominantly rain fed. On an average, the household income among the encroachers is around Rs. 8913/-. Taking official poverty level of Rs. 12000/- per annum, most of the encroachers are below poverty level implying their dependence on encroached lands to supplement their household economy.

 

8. Willing participation of People and voluntary surrender of encroached forestland for CFM:

 

8.1 Support through RAP will be provided only to those who willingly participate in CFM and voluntarily surrender land under their individual possession to VSS for Community Forest Management. The facilitating NGO or Community Organizer (CO) will ensure that lands are surrendered voluntarily and not under compulsions or coercion or  pressure on the affected families.

 

8.2 Wherever such voluntary surrender of encroached land takes place, all steps will be undertaken to document them. This will involve signing of a ‘consent letter’ by the affected person willing to voluntarily surrender the land to VSS and it will be witnessed by the Managing Committee of VSS, Sarpanch or nominee of Sarpanch of the Gram Panchayat, the members of the VSS Advisory Council (VAC). The VSS community will, however, ensure that such persons are not adversely affected and they benefit from the CFM. Veracity of such ‘consent letter’ will be verified by the Divisional level Forestry committee. For this purpose the Divisional level Forestry Committee shall constitute a subcommittee for every Range comprising of the concerned Forest Range Officer, one facilitating NGO/CO and a nominee of ITDA (in tribal area) or DRDA (in other area). This sub committee will also verify the veracity of any claim of loss of livelihood that would have happened during implementation of JFM. Any grievances by the people will be resolved at the VSS level by the VSS Management Committee (MC) and VAC. Unresolved issues will be addressed at different levels – Forest Section, Forest Range, Forest Division District and state (see section 16 for further details). All affected families including those who surrender encroached lands will get support as per the provisions of the R&R policy prepared for the purpose to enable them to restore their livelihood. The legal and policy provisions that are available to ensure that those affected are not left worse off are discussed in the subsequent sections.

 

9. Legal and policy provisions

 

9.1 The existing Land Acquisition Act (LAA) 1894, amended in 1984 and the R&R policy (formulated for this project) provide adequate legal and policy framework to mitigate any adverse impacts of the project interventions on the local population. The major features of this legal and policy framework are given below:

 

9.2  Land Acquisition Act:

 

9.2.1    Land, structures and other immovable assets are not expected for any of the activities under the project, however if any such eventuality arises, the same will be dealt under the LA Act 1894.

9.2.2    An important provision under the Act allows a landholder to ask for the acquisition of his/her remaining holding (after the LA process) if the acquisition of land renders the holding uneconomical or fragmented or make it unviable for operation.

 

9.2.3    Compensation for buildings/structures: If acquisition of certain residential buildings becomes imperative, the same will be compensated at Basic Schedule of Rates (BSR) without deducting any depreciation.  The BSR in the State are decided by the Public works Department (PWD) and are indexed to allow for prevailing market prices.  Displaced persons shall be allowed to take away the building material which they can salvage from the houses at the old sites to make use of the same in the construction of the house in the new locations, yet there will be no reduction in their entitlement to compensation amount.  Transit passes will be issued by a competent official for carrying away wooden frames and all such articles that may warrant issuance of permits. Compensation for buildings/structures on Government land, even those who have encroached on government land and have constructed buildings or structures thereon shall also be paid based on the valuation estimates of the buildings/structures by the \Public Works Department.

 

9.2.4    Compensation for common properties: If land or properties belonging to the community or common places of worship located are acquired, compensation for such acquisition will be paid to facilitate construction of such structures at new places. If the community was availing of some facility prior to the Project, GOAP will ensure the same at the new place/ habitat or at the old site, as the case may be.

 

9.2.5    Compensation for trees: Compensation for trees and other plantations will be determined on the basis of capitalized value of fruits, wood or timber.  The capitalized value of trees, timber and fruits are determined by Horticulture Department / Forest Department in their concerned areas.  Such evaluation is based on the type, age, diameter and yield of the tree.  The Forest Department, every year taking into consideration these factors, prescribes the rates. However trees compensated will not be felled.

 

9.3  R&R Policy

 

9.3.1    As part of SEA, extensive consultations were held on the resettlement issues under the project and how to address them. This included discussions held with individual affected families through interviews, and discussions with village elders and community leaders. Stakeholders workshops were also organized on developing an entitlement framework (see section 10 for details on consultation process and issues discussed). Again as part of RAP revision detailed consultations were held between April and August 2003 with stake holders on the issue. Details of these are given in Annex II. Based on the results of SEA and the consultations carried out, an R&R policy has been formulated by the GOAP to address resettlement issues. .

 

9.3.2    The main objective of the R&R policy (see Attachment I for R&R Policy) is to avoid or minimise   any adverse impact and hardship to the people dependent on forestlands within a VSS area as a result of project interventions.   However, if such adverse impacts cannot be avoided, the policy aims at supporting them by providing alternate opportunities to enhance or at least restore their livelihood. There will be no forcible eviction of people from encroached lands nor any affected person will be left worse off. This policy also covers those VSSs where similar loss of livelihood had occurred during implementation of Joint Forest Management before launch of Community Forest Management.

 

9.3.3    The affected families will be offered a package of assistance to ensure that they are helped to restore their livelihood. Care will be taken to ensure that women members of these families and / a single women among the affected category are involved in the discussions / decisions concerning  the RAP strategies and their concerns are addressed. Specific entitlements that are available to the identified affected families from the R&R Policy are as follows:

·        Skill training and required financial arrangements for income generating (IG) activities

·        Productive Asset Grant (up to Rs.25, 000) for IG activities

·        Access to institutional credit for using financial assistance for IG activities

·        Support from District Industries –Center (DIC), Khadi and Village Industries Corporation (KVIC)

·        Compensation for loss of assets equivalent to cost of asset assessed 

·        Land for land, equivalent in extent of land voluntarily surrendered wherever government revenue or ceiling surplus land is available and acceptable.    

·        Access to government programs for socio-economic development

Besides the above provisions, all affected families will be provided counseling and support in identifying suitable alternate livelihood as well as in ensuring forward and backward linkages. Families taking up non-farm activities will also be guided in procuring the required raw material and marketing of the finished products either on individual family basis or on a group basis.

 

9.3.4    R and R Entitlement Matrix: Following is the entitlement framework for the families affected by the proposed project interventions.

                       

Category of affected families

Mitigation measures (options for rehabilitation)

Families with landholding outside VSS area losing encroached land (for BPL families)

Assistance to improve farming in landholding outside project area through improved farm inputs, and other agriculture support  or

Affected families will be provided support, if opted, to take up income generation activities.

Families entirely dependent on encroached land

Land for land (equivalent in extent of land surrendered voluntarily), where ever government revenue or ceiling surplus land is available and acceptable. Such families will be assisted to improve farming by providing farm inputs, and other agriculture support and access to agricultural credit or                 

Affected families will be provided support, if opted, to take up income generation activities

Families losing housing

 

Provide alternate site or cash in lieu of it

Housing under weaker section housing scheme or a housing construction grant.

Transport for carrying household salvaged material.

Head loaders

Affected families will be provided support,  to take up income generation activities

 

Note: The above mentioned mitigation measures will be provided on individual family basis. These families ( women and men of these families together) may however, on their own accord and depending upon the scheme chosen by them and its viability, decide to organize themselves into groups. In such cases entitlement will be made available to all the individual families of the group. Financial limits of entitlement in such cases will be sum of all entitlements of all the individual families of the group.

 

9.3.5    In addition to the impacts that have been identified so far and listed in the entitlement framework of the policy, if any potential negative impacts are observed  and identified, the project will address them under the broad principles of the agreed upon within the policy framework.

 

 

 

 

10. Consultation with the affected community

 

10.1 Involvement of affected community is vital in planning and implementing R&R programs to get their options for alternate livelihood and to ensure their acceptance of R&R actions planned. While preparing the present RAP and its revision, extensive consultations were held with the affected families and other stakeholders including village elders, village level government officials, NGOs and civil society. While the consultation methods followed to elicit required information are detailed below, the details of consultation including the dates, participants, issues raised and how these have been addressed in the R&R policy and RAP have been presented in Annex II

.                      

Table 4: Consultations held during RAP preparation

 

Stakeholders

Method

Project affected people

Individual interviews, field level observations transect walks

Local VSS and neighboring communities

Focused discussions, Village meetings, regional and state level stakeholders workshops

Elected representatives to local governments

Individual interviews, consultations on forest maps, regional and state level stakeholders workshops

Local forest officials

Joint meetings and individual consultations on forest maps, regional stakeholders workshops

Project officials and line departments

Joint meetings, individual interviews and consultations, regional and state level stakeholders  workshops

NGOs/members of civil society

Consultations and individual meetings, regional and state level stakeholders workshops

 

10.2     Some of the specific issues that were raised at the time of RAP preparation and addressed in the RAP are:

¨      No cash compensation to encroachers for lands encroached by them

¨      All those who voluntarily surrender encroached forest lands should be supported to enable them restore their livelihood

¨      All efforts should be made to dovetail government schemes for the economic rehabilitation of the affected people

10.3       Affected Families’ involvement in the implementation: During implementation of this action plan, the field level functionaries (MC of VSS, NGO/CO, VAC and village functionaries of the Forest Department) responsible for implementing the project at the VSS level with the  involvement of affected families.

 

10.4       VSS level functionaries including MC of VSS, facilitating NGO/CO, VAC and  field level functionaries of FD will ensure full participation of the affected families in each R&R activities as detailed out in the VSS level RAP.


11. Action Plan:

 

The various activities that are required to be undertaken in the order of chronology for implementing the R&R Policy are:

 

1.      Demarcation of the VSS boundary through participative process as specified in G O Ms. No. 13 EFS&T (For III) Department Dt. 12.2.2002 and identifying encroached area included within the VSS boundaries;

2.      Undertaking social impact assessment at the VSS level and identifying affected families. This is to be carried out through participatory process to be endorsed by the VSS General Body and the VSS Advisory Council;

3.      Affected families willing to voluntarily give up their encroached forestland  giving a written consent letter to the VSS and verification of the consent letters by the affected families by the Divisional level forestry committee;

4.      Affected families voluntarily surrendering encroached forest lands or giving up present livelihood pattern;

5.      Documenting such voluntary surrender of forest land or giving up of present livelihood pattern;

6.      Identifying R&R Package as per entitlement framework detailed in the R&R Policy (Attachment 1);

7.      Accessing R&R Grant, government schemes and institutional credit;

8.      Extending support in the operation of income generation scheme.

 

11.1: Demarcation of VSS boundary, identification of encroached land within VSS area: Planning, implementation and monitoring

of all the components of this plan will be done through participatory process including mapping, transact etc.  The VSS and its MC, facilitated by the VSS Advisory council with active participation of facilitating NGO/CO will undertake the social impact assessment. The process will involve mapping of forest area allotted to the VSS, identification of the area encroached (in this context, area affected refers to those lands with in VSS boundaries that are encroached for non forestry use) and the families dependent on such lands. A list of such affected families will be prepared. For each of these families, an assessment of their dependence on encroached land, in terms of the extent of area encroached, area owned and cultivated, income levels and the returns from the encroached land, will also be made. Individual R&R entitlements will be determined as per the criteria laid out in the R&R policy (Attachment 1).

 

11.2     Affected Families voluntarily surrendering land: Action will be initiated only if the affected families voluntarily surrender land in their individual possession that is included in the VSS area. For this purpose they (women and men members of the family concerned) will be required to give a written undertaking or ‘consent letter’ to the concerned VSS chairperson who will forward it to the DFO through the social development specialist nominated for each division (of the rank of Sub DFO / FRO). Such signing of a ‘consent letter’ by the affected family will be witnessed by the Managing Committee of VSS, Sarpanch or nominee of Sarpanch of the Gram Panchayat, the members of the VSS Advisory Council (VAC). The VSS community will, however, ensure that such persons are not adversely affected and that they benefit from the CFM. Veracity of such ‘consent letter’ will be verified by the Divisional level Forestry committee. For this purpose the Divisional level Forestry Committee shall constitute a subcommittee for every Range comprising of the concerned Forest Range Officer, one facilitating NGO/CO and a nominee of ITDA (in tribal area) or DRDA (in other area). This sub committee will also verify the veracity of any claim of loss of livelihood that would have happened during implementation of JFM. 

 

11.3  Issuing notices not to take up sowing: After the identification of the affected area and the affected people, and after approval of R&R entitlements as detailed in para 11.4, VSS will issue notices to individual affected family to refrain them from further sowing in the VSS area. These notices will specify that they would be responsible for any loss of crop during project implementation. This is to ensure that the families who receive and utilize the R&R package do not resort to the earlier livelihood pattern of encroaching forest land that they had voluntarily surrendered.

 

11.4     Extending R&R entitlements: No R&R entitlement will be paid in cash. For procurement of productive asset, the choice of the affected family will be obtained and the asset will be procured and supplied by the FD. Payment for the asset procured will be made by the DFO directly to the supplier of asset. Funds needed for training required will be made available to the identified training centre or the respective resource person/s. This payment will also be made directly by the DFO. Funds required for working capital will be deposited in bank account to be operated jointly by the head of the family of the affected person and Chairperson of the respective VSS. In case of group based economic activity, each group should elect a leader and the joint account will be in the name of group leader and the chairperson of the respective VSS.  The  MC of VSS and facilitating NGO /CO will have a major responsibility in providing the necessary guidance and help in identifying suitable alternative livelihood and income generation activities. Basing on the choice of the affected family/families the MC of the VSS duly consulting the VSS Advisory council will identify the viable income generation activity, formulate proposals and send to the DFO through the FRO and Sub DFO for approval. The DFO will scrutinize the proposal and accord approval. He will also take necessary action to link up required additional financial support from commercial banks, khadi and village industries commission, other Governmental schemes etc.

 

11.5          Economic rehabilitation:

 

11.5.1    Employment during CFM implementation: All affected families will be given wage employment on preferential basis during the process of CFM interventions at the VSS level including watch and ward of the forest areas, plantation activities, thinning operations etc. For this purpose, facilitating NGO/CO will prepare a labour pool profile, comparing skills and types of job executed and along with MC members of VSS ensure that the affected persons get employment opportunities.

 

11.5.2    Identification of alternate economic activities including group based income generation activities: Facilitating NGO/CO will analyze the type of economic activities being carried out in the area, specify existing demand for products and services, the general availability of labour and other resources, profitability, present marketing practices and relationships. It is also necessary that an inventory of existing banks, savings and credit organizations and any informal institutional arrangements for encouraging savings and for providing start-up or expansion capital is also made. Information so gathered will provide the base for preliminary identification of potential income-restoration measures.

 

11.5.3    Assessing feasibility of IG activities: Based on the above information, NGO/CO will assess the feasibility of these activities in a given area and prepare a shelf of suitable income generation activities. NGO/CO will facilitate the affected families to select the activity preferred by them.

 

11.5.4    Assessing training needs: NGO/CO will assess the training needs of the affected families for the alternate economic activities selected by them, identify resource persons or training institutions and organize training programs to equip them with the required skills. No economic activity will be undertaken unless the affected persons have the required skills.

 

11.5.5  Accessing government schemes: NGO/CO with the help of members of MC of VSS and GP will help the affected families to access government schemes. In this process, the FD functionaries, particularly the Forest Range Officer (FRO) and Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) will have major responsibilities to ensure that the affected families are covered under the on-going government programs. This requires that these functionaries work closely with District Collectors and Panchayat Raj Institutions (PRIs) for inclusion of the affected people under government schemes. Similar efforts will be required to help affected families access institutional credit. Forest Committees at the divisional and district level will help coordinate these efforts and ensure that the affected families are supported under the government schemes. NGO/CO along with field level functionaries of FD will ensure forward and backward linkages for the activities undertaken by the affected people. RAPs prepared at the VSS level will include arrangements (and indicators) for monitoring the effectiveness of income restoration measures, and will have provisions to modify  plans found to be ineffective.

 

12.       RAP approval process

 

12.1     RAP will form an integral part of the Micro plan prepared at the VSS level. Its implementation will be synchronized with the physical activities planned under the Micro plan. No physical activity including plantation will take place unless all entitlements are extended and the process of economic rehabilitation has started. Voluntary surrender of land will be well documented and will be checked on a sample basis by an external agency that will be engaged to undertake monitoring of R&R component of the APCFM Project. The responsibility of approving RAP as part of Micro plan will be with the DFO. The FRO at the district level responsible for R&R activities under the project will ensure that RAPs conform to the R&R policy provisions. .

 

12.2     At the state level, the Social Development Specialist in the PMU will be responsible to ensure that RAPs prepared at the VSS level are in accordance with the agreed R&R policy of the project.

 

13.       Institutional Arrangements

 

13.1     The institutional arrangements for the preparation and implementation of RAP involves the availability of the required staff at different levels as described below. Since this is a community driven development project, this requires intensive working with the local forest communities. For this purpose, NGOs will be engaged to facilitate the process. In areas where suitable NGOs are not available, Community Organizers will be engaged to help functionaries of FD to work with the forest communities.

 

13.2     At the State level, the responsibility of monitoring the planning and implementation of the resettlement programs will be with the Social Unit with in the Project Management Unit. The head of this Unit will be a Social Development Specialist of the rank of Deputy Conservator of Forests / Assistant Conservator of Forests. This unit will coordinate with the DFOs and the line departments to ensure smooth implementation of the resettlement activities under the project.

 

13.3     At the forest divisional level, the concerned DFO will coordinate the resettlement activities. For concerted efforts, the Sub DFO or a Forest Range Officer (FRO) will be designated to coordinate and supervise planning and implementing R &R activities in  a division.  He will also provide guidance to the VSS level VAC and NGO/CO.

 

13.4     At the VSS level, planning and implementing R&R activities will be the responsibility of the concerned VSS. To facilitate this process, there will be a VAC comprising of the concerned FSO, FBO or Assistant BO, the Panchayat Sarpanch, representative of the ITDA, the Village Secretary, the NGO/CO actively involved in assisting the V.S.S., and Village School Headmaster/Headmistress.  The Panchayat Sarpanch will chair the VAC meetings. If for any reason he / she is unable to attend the meeting the FSO will preside over the VAC meeting. This council will also help in assessing the availability of government land for families opting for land and also in accessing government schemes in the area.

. 

13.5     Although no new land acquisition is envisaged, if any eventuality arises, acquisition of land and other immovable properties is the responsibility of the Revenue Department of GOAP. At the district level, this is carried out by the District Collector through a designated Land Acquisition Officer.

 

13.6     The organizational set up for planning, implementing and monitoring R&R activities under the project is presented in the flow chart (Annex III).

 

14.       Role of NGOs/Community organizers

Wherever suitable NGOs are available, they will be involved in planning, implementing and monitoring of the Resettlement Action Plan.  If  suitable NGOs are not available, in such areas Community Organizers will be engaged to assist VSS in planning and implementing Micro plans including resettlement activities.   

 

15.              Capacity building to handle R&R activities            

15.1          Since most of the staff in FD at all levels (state, district, divisions, range and VSS) and functionaries of NGO and CO will have little exposure to R&R issues, they will be trained in skills required to handle resettlement activities. Besides, FD staff at different levels, NGO functionaries and COs, VSS management committee members and other field level functionaries of departments of tribal development and rural development associated with the project will also be trained on different aspects of R&R issues related to CFM. The training modules to be developed will focus on:              

¨      policies and procedures in LA and R&R

¨      undertaking social impact assessment

¨      conducting census surveys of affected families

¨      preparing RAP

¨      economic rehabilitation of the affected people

¨      data base management for M&E of R&R programs

 

15.2     A consultant will be engaged to assess the training needs and prepare training modules and material. Training will be organized both at the state and district levels. Each training module will be repeated to cover a large number of those associated with R&R activities under the project. Besides, customized training will be organized in reputed training institutions, both within the state and outside for FD staff associated with R&R activities under the project.

 

15.3     In addition, exposure visits will also be organized for the staff of FD to project sites within the state and outside where R&R programs are being managed successfully.

 

15.4     Good practices will be identified during preparation and implementation of R&R program under the project and these will be documented and disseminated widely among project functionaries, NGOs, COs and VSS. Director A P Forest Academy Dullapalli in FD will coordinate this.

 

15.5     An external agency for Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) engaged under the AP CFM Project will develop a data base, train FD staff, at state, district and divisional levels, in managing the data base and its periodic updating, and assist in preparing data formats and monitoring reports.

 

16.    Grievance Redressal  mechanism

 

All grievances related to land acquisition will be resolved through the provisions available in the LAA, 1894. However, for issues related to R&R activities, a grievance redressal mechanism is already in place at different levels. At the VSS level, its Management Committee and VAC will help resolve any grievances of affected families.  At the Forest Section level, grievances will be addressed by the FSO. Forest Committees (with representations from VSS, Panchayat Raj Institutions, NGOs and concerned line departments) already working at the levels of  ITDA/  Forest Division and the District, will also help finding solutions for issues that are not resolved satisfactorily at the VSS  and Forest Section levels. Constitution of these committees are attached as Annex IV. Besides, the Social Development Specialist at the divisional level and NGO/CO will also assist the affected community in resolving their problems by referring them to the relevant agencies. The NGO/CO will record the grievances of the affected people and present the same in the forest committees for resolution.

There is a state level Independent Advisory Group comprising of people of eminence in the areas of law and justice, social development, rural development and forestry to look into grievances arising out of implementing R&R related activities and advise the FD on suitable actions to be taken to redress them and monitor the same. Composition and TOR for this group are attached in Attachment 2.



17. Monitoring and evaluation

 

17.1 Internal monitoring: M&E of R&R activities planned under RAP is necessary to monitor the progress, identify bottlenecks, take up corrective measures and thus ensure adequate and timely implementation of RAP at the VSS as well as Project level. This provides adequate feedback to make necessary changes in the plan and update the database. The monitoring will be both internal and external. At the project level, the PMU through the Social Development Specialist will carry out conventional internal monitoring focusing on physical and financial aspects. At the divisional levels, this responsibility lies with the DFOs and the Sub DFO/FRO designated for R&R activities.

 

17.2 At the VSS level, the VSS along with representatives of affected families will be responsible to monitor the implementation at the VSS level. In this process, VSS will be assisted by the FD functionaries and NGO/CO at the field level. 

 

 17.3    External monitoring: An external M&E agency engaged for the A P CFM Project will also be responsible to monitor the implementation of R&R component of the project. Monitoring R&R component in other areas will be done by the PMU. This agency will also develop reporting formats to be used at different levels. These formats will have compatibility with the formats used for computer based data base management. The external agency will also be responsible for developing database and its periodic updating. This agency will also train FD staff at the state, district and divisional levels, in managing the computer based data management and its periodic updating. The external agency will submit its periodic monitoring reports at half yearly interval and two evaluation reports – project mid-term and end evaluation  

           

 17.4    Monitoring indicators: A set of indicators have been identified and presented in Annex V. However, the external M&E agency for the project  will also be monitor  the implementation of R&R activities under the project, will update the monitoring parameters and develop monitoring formats to be used at different levels 

.  

18. Implementation schedule

 

18.1 The immediate activities that are planned are establishing a Social Unit within PMU at the state level and post a Social Development Specialist to coordinate all R&R activities under the project at the state level. At the same time, in all those divisions where project activities will be initiated in the first year of the project, a Sub DFO/ FRO will be designated and made responsible for R&R activities GOAP will also contract NGO/CO in such areas where project activities are proposed to be undertaken in the first year of the project for monitoring RAP activities. These staff along with NGO/CO will facilitate VSS to undertake social impact assessment and prepare VSS based RAPs as part of Micro plans. Before the VSS initiate social impact assessment and prepare RAPs, training programs will be organized to equip them with required skills. Similarly, no income generation activities will be established unless the required training has been organized for the affected people. The detailed implementation schedule is shown in Table 5. 

 

19. Costs and budget:

The experience of motivating tribals who had encroached forest lands to give up agriculture on such lands and to bring them under productive tree cropping has given positive results in the North coastal Andhra Pradesh, especially in Visakhapatnam district. As already stated, nearly 37000 ha of encroached forestland was reclaimed through afforestation. This issue was deliberated in the various stakeholders’ workshops. Based on the experience of dealing with such situations during implementation of Joint Forest Management and the deliberations of the stakeholders workshops, it is estimated that not more than 50% of the encroachers would give up encroached land and take to alternate livelihood opportunities. Therefore, the tentative budgeting for this RAP is prepared presuming that 50% of encroachments and livelihood patterns are likely to be voluntarily surrendered in favor of VSS for CFM This estimate also includes similar eventuality that would have happened during implementation of Joint Forest Management.  Out of 5000 VSSs included in the APCFMP, SEA and microplanning has been taken up in those VSSs that do not trigger R&R Policy and RAP.  This process has been initiated and completed in 4247 VSSs so far (by December 2003). The remaining 753 VSSs are likely to attract implementation of R&R Policy and RAP. As seen from the data gathered during SEA for preparation of APCFMP, 8 VSSs reported families likely to be adversely affected due to implementation of this Project. These 8 VSSs reported 172 PAFs likely to be affected. Thus considering the average of 21.5 families per VSS (172 families in 8 VSSs), anticipated families likely to be affected in 753 VSSs is 16190. Going by the previous experience and as already stated above 50% of these families only are likely to voluntarily give up their present in favour of VSSs. In view of this, this RAP provides for rehabilitation grant and livelihood opportunities to an estimated 8095  families. The figures will be updated during the course of implementation of RAP will be revised accordingly. The details of rehabilitation measures are given below.

 

19.1     The cost items and norms used in developing the budget for R&R are as follows:

¨      VSS undertaking social impact assessment (SIA) and preparing RAP

¨      Provision for skill training at Rs 1,000 per affected family. It will be provided to one adult member of the family.

¨      Rehabilitation grant (up to Rs 25,000) for IG activity for each affected family

¨      Rehabilitation grant for group based income generation activities in respect of those VSSs where forest treatment on encroached forestlands had already happened during implementation of Joint Forest Management will be Rs. 25,000. This includes amount for providing assets and working capital wherever required.

¨      Capacity building (of FD staff, functionaries of NGO/CO, MC members of VSS, and other village level government functionaries concerned with R&R activities) at Rs 600 per VSS member and Rs 3,000 per trainee (staff and NGO/CO functionaries)

¨       External M&E agency to review and monitor all RAPs (This requirement is included in the Consultancy on Independent M&E of the Project).

¨      Contracting an HRD agency to assess training needs, and develop training modules and materials

¨      Contingency is built in the costs.

 

19.2       The details of the budget over the project period is presented in Table 6.  The budget for R&R activities at the VSS level will form an integral part of Micro Plan and other costs will come from the project.


Table 5: RAP implementation schedule (for APCFM Project. For other VSSs, RAP s will be prepared and implemented along with microplans)

Project activities

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

 

 

Planning process (though planning process will be taken up in all the 5000 VSSs, RAP related planning will be taken up only in those VSSs that trigger implementation of R&R Policy. This is likely in 753 of the 5000 VSSs).

SIA initiated (No. of VSS)

4247

753

 

 

 

 

SIA completed (No. of VSS)

4247

753

 

 

 

 

RAP completed (No. of VSS)

 

753

 

 

 

 

RAPs approved by DFO (No.)

 

 

753

 

 

 

 

Institutional

Establishing a SD Unit in PMU

Established

 

 

 

 

 

Posting of Social Development Specialists in PMU

Posted

 

 

 

 

 

Designating Sub DFO/FRO at the district level for R&R activities (No.)

Designated

 

 

 

 

 

Equipping SD units at state/district levels

Completed

 

 

 

 

 

Engaging NGO/CO (No.)

Engaged

 

 

 

 

 

Contracting consultant for training need assessment

January 2004

 

 

 

 

 

Contracting an external M&E agency

Engaged

 

 

 

 

 

Capacity building

Preparing training manual and material

March  2004

 

 

 

 

 


 

Training FD staff &  NGO/CO

June 2004

 

 

 

 

 

Training VSS members

June 2004

 

 

 

 

 

Exposure trips

September 2004

 

 

 

 

 

Documenting good practices

 

June 2005

 

 

 

 

Developing data base and management

March 2004

 

 

 

 

 

Implementation of RAP

No. of VSS Where PAFs surrendering land (753)

 

2004-05

 

 

 

 

Issuing notices to prohibit sowing on encroached land

 

2004-05

 

 

 

 

PAFs extended R&R entitlements

 

2004-05

 

 

 

 

Organizing training for IGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facilitating access to credit and market

 

 

 

 

 

 

IG activities established (No.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monitoring IG activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Budget for R&R component: An amount of Rs 207.10 million is needed for meeting required for the activities contemplated. Details are given in below.

 

R&R activity

Unit cost

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Total

 

 

Phy

Fin

Phy

Fin

Phy

Fin

Phy

Fin

Phy

Fin

Phy

Fin

SIA and VSS base RAP preparation

0.005Per VSS

Included in micro-planning. No separate budget.

R&R grant to PAF

0.025 Per PAF

0.00

0.00

8095

202.375

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

8095

202.375

Training need assessment, development of training modules and training material

 

 

0.02

 

0.08

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.10

Training to PAFs in skill upgradation for IGA and for utilizing RR Grant for 2 members per PAF

Ls

00.00

0.00

1610

2.415

1610

0.805

1610

0.805

 

0.00

1610

4.025

Training to NGOs

Ls

 

 

200

0.30

200

0.10

 

 

 

 

200

0.40

Training to FD functionaries

Ls

 

 

100

0.15

100

0.05

 

 

 

 

100

0.20

Engaging M&E agency

Included in hiring M&E consultant for Project monitoring. No separate budget for RAP.

Total

 

 

0.02

 

205.32

 

0.955

 

0.805

 

 

 

207.10

 


Annex I

    Socio-economic profile of Project Affected Families

    Distribution of PAFs by social group

 

VSS reporting encroachment

ST

SC

BC/OC

Total

Tittingvalasa

30

--

--

30

Moolaboddaru

9

--

--

9

Gandhinagram

5

--

1

6

Meduru I

32

--

--

32

Chekkapuram

10

--

--

10

Kanchenpalli

--

--

20

20

Mohammadnagar

21

3

2

26

Nizampet

29

1

9

39

Total

136

4

32

172

 

                                    Population and working members

 

VSS reporting encroachment

Total population

Av. Family size

Total working members

Av. Working members/family

Tittingvalasa

117

3.9

59

2.0

Moolaboddaru

47

5.2

22

2.3

Gandhinagram

27

5.4

14

2.8

Meduru I

135

4.2

79

2.5

Chekkapuram

48

4.8

28

2.8

Kanchenpalli

155

7.7

87

4.3

Mohammadnagar

125

4.1

64

2.1

Nizampet

184

4.4

92

2.3

Total

838

4.9

445

2.6

                                   

                                    Distribution of families by landholding size

 

            VSS reporting encroachment

No. of families by landholding size

Landless

Upto 1 ha

1-2 ha

>2 ha

Total

Tittingvalasa

2

19

9

0

30

Moolaboddaru

8

1

0

0

9

Gandhinagram

6

0

0

0

6

Meduru I

32

0

0

0

32

Chekkapuram

0

6

4

0

10

Kanchenpalli

1

6

12

1

20

Mohammadnagar

3

3

15

5

26

Nizampet

8

20

6

5

39

Total

60

55

46

11

172

             

 

 

Operational holding and extent of encroachment

 

            VSS reporting encroachment

Total

Operational

Holding (ha)

Owned

Land under cultivation (ha)

Encroached Land (ha)

% of owned land to operational holding

% of encroached land to operational holding

Tittingvalasa

37.33

23.85

13.48

63.89

36.11

Moolaboddaru

8.00

0.50

7.50

6.25

93.75

Gandhinagram

11.70

--

11.70

--

100.00

Meduru I

76.50

17.00

59.50

22.22

77.78

Chekkapuram

13.25

5.75

7.50

43.40

56.60

Kanchenpalli

27.90

22.70

5.20

81.36

18.64

Mohammadnagar

84.00

39.20

44.80

46.66

53.30

Nizampet

108.25

49.25

64.00

45.50

59.12

Total

366.93

158.25

213.68

36.49

58.24

 

                                                Extent of dependence on encroached land

 

VSS reporting encroachment

Household earning (Rs.)

Return From Encroached Land (Rs.)

% of returns from encroached land to total HH income

Tittingvalasa

301500

53000

17.58

Moolaboddaru

60600

11700

19.30

Gandhinagram

41800

5800

13.86

Meduru I

118000

36000

30.75

Chekkapuram

39900

13300

33.33

Kanchenpalli

505100

67500

13.36

Mohammadnagar

184700

48600

26.31

Nizampet

281500

180000

63.94

Total

1533100

415900

27.12

 

                                    Distribution of families by income level

                       

VSS reporting encroachment

No. of PAFs

No. of families by levels of income

<11,000

11,001 to 15,000

15,001 to 20,0000

>20,000

Tittingvalasa

30

23

7

0

0

Moolaboddaru

9

9

0

0

0

Gandhinagram

6

6

0

0

0

Meduru I

32

30

1

1

0

Chekkapuram

10

10

0

0

0

Kanchenpalli

20

2

1

7

10

Mohammadnagar

26

26

0

0

0

Nizampet

39

33

6

0

0

Total

172

139

15

8

10

 

 

            Distribution of families by the % of income from encroached land

 

VSS reporting encroachment

No. of PAFs

No. of families by % of income from encroached land

<10%

10-25%

25-50%

>50%

Tittingvalasa

30

6

20

4

0

Moolaboddaru

9

1

8

0

0

Gandhinagram

6

2

4

0

0

Meduru I

32

0

1

19

12

Chekkapuram

10

0

2

8

0

Kanchenpalli

20

5

12

2

1

Mohammadnagar

26

7

17

0

2

Nizampet

39

4

12

16

7

Total

172

25

76

49

22

 


                                                                        Annex II 

Consultation with affected community and other stakeholders

Details of stakeholders’ consultation during RAP preparation

 

As a part of the preparation of A.P. Community Forest Management Project, workshops have been held with the various stakeholders to elicit their suggestions and recommendations for the future project.  The agencies that have held these workshops are: a) NIRD Hyderabad, the consultant appointed to conduct the Social and Environmental Assessment, b) M/s OM Consultants, Bangalore appointed to conduct Institutional Assessment Study, c) Center For World Solidarity, Hyderabad an NGO and d) the Forest Department. The NIRD held two state level workshops and three regional workshops, OM consultants held one state level Workshop, Center for World Solidarity held one state level workshop and four regional workshops and the forest department held two regional workshops. Besides these workshops, individual interviews with the potential affected families, focus group discussions, participatory mapping, transect walk, discussions with villages level knowledgeable persons, representatives of local bodies, VSS members, etc, were also held. The following table provides pertinent information on the issues discussed and views obtained during the stakeholders workshop on different aspects of the project including R&R.

             

Workshop

Place

Date

Districts covered

Participants

Total Parti-cipants

FD officials

NGOs

VSS Members

Workshops conducted by NIRD

State Level

Dullapalli

SFA

6.9.01

     --

32

2

     --

34

Regional –I

Tirupati

12.9.01

Chittoor

Cuddapah

Nellore

32

4

4

48

Regional –II

Mancherial

19.10.01

Nizamabad

Adilabad

Khammam

Medak

31

5

19

55

Regional-III

Rajahmundry

22.10.01

Visakhapatnam

Srikakulam

Vizianagaram

36

6

13

55

State Level

Dullapalli

SFA

2.11.01

   All districts

22

2

6

30

Workshops conducted by OM consultants

State Level Work shop

Dullapalli

SFA

31-8-2001

All districts

60

 

 

 60

Workshops conducted by Center for World Solidarity

State level

Hyderabad

18-07-01

 

14

43

26

83

Regional level

Visakhapatnam

26-6-2001

Srikakulam, Vizianagaram and Visakhapatnam

50

50

39

139

Regional  level

Warangal

29-6- 2001

Warangal, Karimnagar and Khammam

23

5

50

78

 Regional level

Nirmal

3-7-2001

Adilabad, Nizamabad and Medak

47

25

86

158

Regional level

Cuddapah

6-7-2001

Cuddapah, Chittoor and Nellore

38

13

86

137

 

Workshops Conducted by the Forest Department

Regional Work Shop

Warangal

22-11-2000

Telangana and Andhra Regions

65

 

 

65

Regional Workshop

Tirupathi

30-11-2000

Rayalaseema Region

46

 

 

46

 

 

2. Consultations with stakeholders’ for revising RAP during 2003: In addition to the above workshops that were held before preparing the AP Community Forest Management Project series of consultation meetings were conducted during April to August 2003 on the R&R Policy. In all 134 meetings were held on the issue. 10061 VSS members including those affected or likely to be affected, 602 NGOs and 2816 Officers and staff participated in these meetings. Of the members likely to be affected, 37.57% were found to be dependent exclusively on forestlands that they had encroached, 22.18% had lands outside the VSS forests in addition to forestlands occupied them in the VSSs, 39.66% were head-loaders and 0.59% were likely to lose houses. The R&R Policy that was prepared for the A P Community Forest Management Project was discussed at length during these meetings. These meetings were conducted for having detailed deliberations on the issues regarding R&R Policy and the Resettlement Action Plan that was prepared as part of A P Community Forest Management Project, examine it critically and come up with suggestions for its further improvement to establish a mechanism to ascertain voluntary nature of relinquishment especially of encroachments of forest lands in VSS areas and to widen the scope of the R&R Policy and Resettlement Action Plan to cover all the VSSs irrespective of source of funding and to cover similar eventualities that would have occurred during implementation of Joint Forest Management.

Details of Participants at various consultation meetings is given below:

Sl. no

Consultation level

No. of consultations

Number of participants

VSS/Affected people

NGOs

FD Staff

Total

1

Range

90

4815

198

1040

6053

2

Division

34

3992

243

1199

5434

3

Circle

9

1144

124

477

1745

4

State

1

110

37

100

237

Total

134

10061

602

2816

13469


 


The existing R&R Policy specifying packages for different categories of affected people prepared in Telugu was circulated to the stakeholders for discussions.

 

 

State level consultation meeting:      

After consultations with stakeholders at division level a state level meeting was conducted on 18.8.2003 at Hyderabad. The stakeholders who participated in the earlier meetings at range, division and circle level have participated in the state level meeting

Opinions of the stakeholders in Range, Division and Circle level meetings:

Division: Nirmal

Participant

Observation

B. Kalyan,

The affected families are very poor and they are dependent exclusively on the land encroached.

Shankar,

The encroachers are completely dependent on the forestland.  They are not ready to leave the encroached land because they are not having any other livelihood.

 

Division: Adilabad

Participant

Observation

Laxmibai

200 Acres land is under occupation. If irrigation facilities are provided in their patta land, they are ready to leave  the occupied land.

H.K. Jhaku 

Willing to surrender the land if any land or benefits are provided  to him.

Muthyam Reddy  

Due to illegal fellings the forests are reducing day by day and requested all the members to adopt the R&R policy which is very good.

Laxman  

About 520 Acres of land is under cultivation since 1972. If they are given (5) Acre patta each they are ready to surrender the remaining encroached land.

Motiram,

Occupied land is more. If irrigation facility is provided to patta land they are ready to handover the occupied land

Ramulu,

40-50 Acres of land is under occupation. Not willing to hand over this occupied land

Porushuram

If sufficient water facility will be provided at a plot, they are willing to handover this occupied land.

R. Krishna,

Some persons are completely dependent on the occupied land. If alternate support can be provided they are ready to handover the land.

Sajeev Rao,  

The policy introduced by the Govt. is very good and each & every person should understand the policy and handover the land

Gamgaram,

He  is earning Rs.25000/- per annum from the occupied land of (5) Acres. If the Government provides Bore well he is willing to spare (2) Acres land to VSS

K. Bondu,

He encroached 3 acre land in addition to the10 acres patta land he possess. If irrigation facility is provided to patta land he is  willing to handover the encroached land.

Beershaw

He has occupied 10 acres of land , out of which  he is willing to spare 5 acres for raising  plantation.

Shanker

He encroached 8 acre land in addition to the 8 acres patta land he possess. If irrigation sources are provided to patta land he is ready to surrender the entire occupied land.

Sakru bai,

Not willing to spare the occupied land

Athram Ramu,

No body is willing to spare the occupied land, but (3) persons are willing to spare to the extent of 10-12 acres


 

P. Gangaram

 Each family in the VSS is ready to surrender 6 acres out of the encroached 10 acre land to Forest Department. He wants  to raise plantations of fruit trees like mango, Sitapal, Neem etc.

K.Dongu Rao

He has agreed to hand over the encroached land to Forest Department if another agriculture land is given to them or plantations of fruit trees are raised

P. Noor Singh

He has agreed to hand over the encroached land to Forest Department if another agriculture land is given to them or monetary support is extended.

M. Maruthi  

He stated that the encroached land will be given to Forest Department subject to discussion with their general body at their village level. They are ready to give only part of the encroached land retaining part of it. The Department should provide irrigation facility to the land retained by them.

N.Jangu

He stated that out of 15 Acres land encroached by each family in their VSS. all are ready to give 10 Acres to Forest Department subject to providing irrigation facility to the balance 5 Acres land retain by them.

A.Bheem Rao

He stated that they are ready to give encroached lands provided  they are rehabilitated  & resettled at a better place.

 

Division: Bellampally

 

Participant

Observation

Alumula Bheemaiah

Does not want to loose his encroached land but agreed to protect adjacent forest area

Raju master

Rehabilitation land may be provided nearer to Sungapur Project

K. Keshav

Not willing to handover the podu land

Sedam Raju

Not willing to handover the podu land but willing to assist Forest Dept. in protecting the forests

D. Narayana

Willing to surrender 50% of podu lands for rehabilitation.

B. Pochaiah

Land may be provided to construct the houses

A. Shanker

Expressed doubt as how the Govt. can provide rehabilitation.

D. Mallaiah

Expressed doubt as how the Govt. can provide rehabilitation.

K. Rajaiah

The Govt. should  show the alternate land for rehabilitation immediately .

A. Chinnakka

Alternate land may be provided in lieu of podu land

Mallesh,

Compensation of  the podu land may be provided with wet lands

Jangu bai

If any individual is not satisfied with the compensation provided in leiu of podu land, the incumbent may be permitted to continue with podu cultivation.

Ada Thirupathi rao

Due to poverty and daily wages people are resorting to head loads smuggling. If the govt. provides alternate resources no. of  headloads smuggled  may come down.

 

Division: Jannaram

Are Dubbarajam

I bring 16 bamboos per day to make mats daily. From this we get Rs.50 per week. If loan is sanctioned I will open a  Kiranashop/purchase an Auto for my livelihood and stop this practice.

Maddikunta Shanker

For my livelihood I get bamboo from forest. If 1-Acre land is provided along with two oxen and plough, I will not bring bamboo.


 

K. China Bheemaiah

For my livelihood I bring 16 bamboos for which I get Rs.50 per week. Hence, for cultivation purpose land along with oxen and plough may be provided as livelihood for my family.

Komre Rajavva

I depend on bamboo from forest. Rs.20000/- loan may be provided for vegetable business for my survival.

K.Gattaiah

I’m a labor. I go for daily wages and also get bamboo. One Auto may be provided for my livelihood

B.Bheemaiah

I get bamboo from forest. Loan may be provided to do vegetable business

Bheemanna

I get bamboo from forest. Loan may be provided for 30 sheep.

Madikunta Padma

I get bamboo from forest. Loan may be provided for vegetable business

Jaineni Posam

I get bamboo from forest. Loan may be provided for vegetable business

Thatra Venkati

I make 16 bamboo mats per day. One pair oxen and one cart may be provided for my livelihood.

Mudugu Bhoomaiah

I  am cultivating  5 Ac of  podu land. 2 Acres land and 20 sheep may be provided

Kotturi Posham

I  am cultivating  3 Ac  of Podu. I will give 2 Ac to Forest Department. 1 Ac  land ,20sheeps and one auto may be provided for my livelihood.

Mudugu Chinnaiah

  I  am cultivating  3 Ac land  . In 1 acre    I will cultivate green grams and surrender 2 ac. 1 Oil Engine, 10 sheep &2 buffaloes may be provided for my livelihood.

Mudugu Jhani

 I  am cultivating   4 acres of podu land. I will give 2 acres instead you have to provide me with  land, 1 well, a motor & 20 sheep.

Madavi Bheem bai

My husband sells poles. If we stop this immediately then what about our livelihood?. Loan may be provided for vegetable business.

Kampalli Linganna

I have 4 Acres of Podu, I will surrender 2 acres to VSS if you provide me with 2 milch animals and Rs.40000/-.

 

 

Division: Kagaznagar

Participant

Observations

Morla Posubai

I don’t have other land for cultivation.  If you raise plantations I cannot wait for 5 years. In the three acres podu land I am cultivating jowar.

Kosaraju

I possess 5 acres podu land in which 3 acres only is cultivable.  If Govt. extends support I am ready to raise fruit trees like mango.

Ananthula Suresh

Villagers are questioning  whether land will be given to them after raising fruit trees.  Further they have questioned about their means of livelihood for those 5 years.

Nagram Davu

I am cultivating podu land for the past 15 years. If  I leave that land how will I live?

Navugare Chukaiah

I am cultivating podu areas for past 10 years.  I want land  instead this land.

Tulsiram

I will leave the land if Govt. gives  5-8 acres  per 10 acres of podu .land with bore facility

Dongri Prabhakar

I   did podu in consultation with the villagers. I will accept any developmental activity suggested by Govt.

Gadi Poshetti

I possess 16 acres podu land and I have 8 children.  If divided each child will get 2 acres land.  How can I leave this land.

Halam Bimakka

We are cultivating podu areas.  If well is dug in that area who will incur the cost.?

Julme Onaji

Sub DFO has explained detailedly. People have to think and decide.

Manepally Munukku

In the past, lands were very productive.  Even from fresh areas crop yield will be more.  Hence people are going for fresh areas.  If Govt. extend support in all means we will a bide by your suggestion.

Amrutha

We don’t have podu areas in our VSS. Govt. will not give patta for podu areas.  Plant trees in this areas.

 

Nayani Satiyamma

We are cultivating for past 5 years.  Forests are being degraded by this practice.

Bandi Sambaiah

In our village there are 15-20 families taking up podu.  Some have other lands also.  Bore facility should be provided in these lands.

Jumdi Gurudas

Podu should not be encouraged. Forest lands needs to be protected.

Sadashiv

In our village people started cultivating podu areas seeing other villages.  Action has not been initiated against them.

Athram Bapu

We will not leave the entire encroached lands. We also need fruit trees.

Nikadi Jaggaiah

Each person has encroached 2-6 acres land. To some extent we will plant forests species only. We will prevent further encroachments.

Koratha Kullubaba 

Each person has 1-2 acres of patta land. For the rest encroached area we need pattas

Sidam Sakaru

We are not practicing podu in mysora. We will go according to the suggestion of FD.  If 50-60 hectors lands is given under extension .We will raise forest species in that area.

K.Jalapathi

Podu cultivation is going on from 1991-92.  & FSO have been doing  developmental works  in our land. There is  a pond in the RF down which cultivation are going on. We are not willing to leave this land.  In past also they have attempted to raise medicinal plants.  They should be brought under TDP.  We will not encroach further.

Gangaram

In Survey no. 91 PP people are willing  to plant forest species.  This area has been encroached for last 20 years.  There are illegal pattas in RF area.

R. Bhimakka

Planting work has to  be started in VSS lands. There are many forestry lands under illegal occupation.  By completing microplans forestry development works have to be started immediately.  Works will go on only  with the complete cooperation villagers.

Atram Shamrao

Patta lands are very few. Many lands are under illegal occupation. Trench has to be  dug around podu lands.  It will avoid expansion of illegally occupied podu lands.  Forests have decreased. Villagers have to be convinced to lose some land and I will try for this.

                                              


 

Division: Kamareddy

 

Participant

Observation

P. Ranjit Nayak

 

There is illegal cultivation in this VSS. The effected families should be given either land, sheep, auto or support for a provision store.

B. Padma

VSS members have been preventing people from encroachments and trying to evict people. If you provide financial support to the encroachers instead of punishing them, they will further encroach the forest lands.

Ganga sing

Govt. should take following measures to prevent cultivation.

1. Power supply should be stopped.

2. The records of encroached land should be given to MRO for necessary action.

3. Sarpanch should help the VSS members in preventing cultivation.

4. Govt. should not provide any assistance to the encroachers.

5. For encroachers cultivating 1acre land rehabilitation should provided if he evicts the area,  as decided by the VSS committee.

6. For people not willing to surrender encroached lands should be prosecuted by Govt.

7. VSS members should be provided insurance and financial help in the form of honorarium.

B. Balaiah 

In case of old encroachments either Govt. should convince them or take action on them.  VSS committee cannot help as it will create rift in the village.  If  necessary VSS may be cancelled.  However, we will prevent further encroachment.

 

Division: Warangal (S)

 Participant.

Observation

Y. Narayana

 VSS rejects the idea of providing alternate livelihood support to people having lands outside project area in addition to encroached lands

D. Veeranna

VSS  opined that for those persons who are dependant entirely on lands encroached, alternate support  should in the form of land ,agricultural implements etc; should be provided,

B. Ramulu

For affected persons having no other means of livelihood   alternative support for income generation should be provided.

A. Dargaiah

Persons likely to loose house, should be allowed to take their possessions from the old house and should be provided grant to construct house. 

B. Ratnam

Persons not willing to surrender encroached lands should be made to raise plantations in that area and VSS has agreed for profit sharing.

A. Bhadraiah

Head loaders should be supported with alternate income generation activities and also VSS has agreed to include them in VSS works.

G. Suvali 

In encroached lands , the encroachers should be made to raise plantations and VSS has agreed for this livelihood support.

B. Laxmi 

For persons having land outside project area in addition to encroached land no support should be provided . If  any support is provided then it will encourage further encroachments.

Division: Karimnagar (W)

 

Participant.

Observation

Srinivas

DRDA should sanction Community irrigation well for the affected families for persons having land outside project area in addition to land encroached and are likely to loose it.

Satyanarayana

No form of support should be provided, as it will further encourage encroachments.

Komuraiah

Support for cultivating outside land like providing irrigation facilities and financial support etc should be provided.

N.Ramulu

Provide any financial support

Premchand Yadav

After confirming the truth, provide livelihood support.

G.Balashekar

If we extend any help for these people we will be encouraging them for further encroachments.

Banda Lakshmi Rajam

 Do not provide any support if you provide

fresh encroachments will start.

M. Chandriah 

If we extend any help for these people we will be encouraging them for further encroachments.

Rajireddy

Provide support to generate additional income for families having alternate sources of income and are likely to be affected.

Ganga Reddy

Don’t encourage by supporting largely for families having alternate sources of income and are likely to be affected.

Srinivasu

Provide support from Velugu project for families having alternate sources of income and are likely to be affected by project.

Pallepu Lakshman 

Provide me some daily labour then I’ will not go to forest.

Lakshman Yadav

For families not willing to surrender encroached lands, evict them by providing land outside project area. (Or)If plantation is raised then after excluding extraction costs the profit share should be 50:50 for VSS and the affected family respectively.

Chalimella Rajalingam

For  people who are entirely dependent on land encroached and are likely to be affected, verify whether these people have bought lands with income from encroached lands  and if there are such people don’t extend any help to them.

Srinivasu

Income generation activities should be taken up with help from S.C. Corporation, B.C. Corporation or ITDA according to the caste .

Raji Reddy

Alternate land for that land should be provided along with irrigation facilities.

Komuraiah

Revenue Poramboke lands should be given . It is very good if buffaloes are also provided.

Gangaiah

Survey the forest areas properly and verify if they are really encroached or not.

Devaiah

Evict the encroachers by providing some alternate means of livelihood.

 


Division: Nalgonda

 

Participant

Observation

Ch. Mattaiah

Horticulture plants should be raised in encroached land, benefits should be shared 50:50 between Govt. and encroacher.

K. Laxamaiah

1 Benefits from VSS area should be shared in 70:30 ratio in between VSS and Govt.

2. Permission to raise horticulture crops on encroached land should be given.

J. Mallesham

For the head loaders alternative should be arranged by providing dried material, material coming out of cultural operations

R. Saidulu

1. For the head loaders alternative should be arranged by providing general stores and other alternative incoming generating sources.

2. Permission to raise horticulture crops on encroached land should be given..

3.  Benefits from VSS area should be shared in 70:30 ratio in between VSS and Govt.

P.Chinni

Alternate employment arrangement should be created for the people who are dependent on forest.

M.Bichya Nayak

Agriculture land   cultivated by me for the last 23 years should be registered in my name . For the Head Loaders housing and other alternative employment generating activities should be provided by providing economic support

 

Division: Kakinada

Participant

Observation

Karam Lacha Rao Dora.

The individual has two Ac. Of land, but due to improper irrigation facility  &  no cattle to plough his land, he become a professional head loader.  He is ready to get rid of the profession, if a couple of cattle are provided to plough his kind.

Karim Chinnnalu Dora,

 

Though the individual has 5 Ac of land yunder D.Form. Patta, but due to improper irrigation facility and has no cattle to plough  his land, he became a professional Head Loader. He is ready to get rid of the profession, if a couple of cattle are provided to plough his land.

Podium Posayya Dora

The individual has no land.  He is completely dependent on forests. His livelihood is collecting firewood from the nearest forests and selling the same in the nearest villages.  He wants an alternative livelihood to his present profession of head loader.

Panda Jaggamma

 

 

 

 

The individual has no land. He is completely dependent on forests. His livelihood is collecting firewood from the nearest forests and selling the same in the nearest villages. He wants an alternative livelihood to withdraw his present profession of Head loader.

Julumuri Veera Babu

Stated that there are 50 head loaders.  How will they survive if they are stopped? Govt. has to show permanent means of livelihood like giving financial support to 25 persons, bullock carts to 10 persons and sheep to 15 families.  

Bachchala Venkat Rao

There are 25 head loaders and for livelihood support they should be given Sheep (20 members)& Cattle (5 members).

Kondra Suri Babu 

25 head loading families are there. Affected youth who are educated should be given autos and others should be given 15 sheep, cattle and provision store.

Mulla Lachchi Reddy

Possess  10 acres podu land from 10 years which has been included in the Devarapalli VSS area and bamboo plantation is raised by department in 2001

Podiyam Ganga Raju 

Posess podu land for livelihood  which has been included in the Sunnampadu VSS area and bamboo plantation is raised by department in 2001

Sundru Bhumayya

Cultivating  podu land for livelihood  which has been included in the Ramanna valasa VSS area and bamboo plantation is raised by department in 2001

 

Division : Khammam

Participant.

Observation

Ajura Bansilal

First Government has to issue Patta lands. Then we leave the Forestland.

Tejavat Kamala,

.

We are not interested to plant trees in podu lands. VSS will not have any right on that land.

Gangavat Bicca,

 

So many people are depending on podu cultivation.  We are ready to plant trees.  We should plant fruit trees.

Mukti Sreenivasa Rao.

 

If we cultivate in podu lands we get  more benefit.  If we cultivate in Patta lands, we get less benefit. So we request the government to allot us a good agriculture  land.

Saidulu

 

We agree  for the clonal plantations  in VSS area.  For the poor head-loaders,  government  should help  by providing  buffaloes  or finance.

Chunchu Babu

Every year it is very difficult to live without crop. Per acre  we get Rs. 8000/-. Yearly we get 2 crops. If Government takes the land, how can our children  live?  So we are not agreeing to handover the crop lands.  In case  if the Government   gives the crop lands with all facilities,  then we are ready to leave the Podu lands.

Padiga Ramaiah

 

If government takes away the occupied land, we do not have anything for our livelihood. Crop is  not sufficient and my family is big . We have 4 acres of  Podu land. In case if the government plant trees, it will take lot of time to give its produce.  For this reason, we are not agreeing.

                                      

Division: Kothagudem

Participant

Observation

Daravath Bheema

Each household should be given 5 acres as pattas.25 acre podu land occupied by my 4 sons should  be made pattas.

Badavath Ramdan

There is no irrigation facility in our lands. Hence I’m not willing to leave the encroached land.

Made Papaiah

I posses 5 acres land .You can raise  mango, cashew etc, but ownership of land should remain with me.

Jara Rambabu

I can give 3 acres for raising fruit species in the 7 acres land I possess.

Irpa Okkaiah

I will raise fruit trees like mango in the 3 acres I possess ,if the seedlings are given.

Veesam Neelaiah

We are dependant on this land for the past 25 years hence we are not willing to hand over.

Polam Jaggaram

The lands I possess has good facility of irrigation and more productive than other lands hence I am not willing to leave it

Eesam Swami

My father had cultivated 10 acres of land on distribution we got 2 acres only. It will be good if it is improved.

Pusem Malliah

I possess 3 acres of land which I cannot give.

Kunja Ramaiah

I possess 2 acres of land which, I cannot give even if alternate land is given.

 

Division: Paloncha

Participant

Observation

Tati Nangaiah

We have no objection to hand over encroached land if alternate livelihood is provided in the form of clonal and fruit tree plantations. We will not encroach fresh areas.

Payam Punnamma

We don’t own any land. Podu lands  in our possession for the past 10 years should be left for us. We do not agree for surrender of land because it is the source of our livelihood.

Payam Kamaraju

We are cultivating the podu lands for past 25 years which we will not surrender. They are our livelihood as we do not possess land elsewhere. We have approached the revenue people repeatedly to issue pattas for that land. We request the forest and revenue departments to allot those lands to us. We will not encroach any fresh areas

Yasam Rajamma

We do not possess any land. For the past 25 years we are dependant on these podu lands which we will not surrender. We do not want to go to jail in this respect. Do justice to us.

Banothu Chawla

Since 1986 floods we are struggling for livelihood. We are cultivating podu lands and raising crops. We do not possess land .ITDA, P.O has promised to issue pattas .So we are not going to surrender our lands.

Tati Rajamma

I am cultivating 3 acres  podu land .Our lands should be kept to us only.

 

Division: Narsipatnam.

Participant

Observation

Nurmani Krishnam Naidu

When  VSS is formed, 8 families have lost 18 acres land as it is included in the VSS. They are dependent on this land entirely.

Gollori Nani Babu

4 families have surrendered 12 acres of land to VSS.

Sahina China Ramachary

In the 125 ha allotted to VSS, 4 families have lost 20 acres of land.

Kotari Appa Rao

In the area allotted to VSS, kotari Somaiah has surrendered 8 acres of land, on which he is dependent.

Sangi Konda babu

9 families have surrendered 23 acres of land during formation of VSS.

Vanthala Rama Rao

6 families have surrendered 15 acres of podu land to VSS.

Not Clear

 In VSS areas there are no affected families.

Gandi Chinna Krishna chary

4 families have surrendered 12 acres to the VSS.

Sagina Chinna baba chary

4 families have surrendered 8 acres land to VSS.

Kilodi bonju babu

3 families have lost 12 acres of land, during formation of VSS.

Korra Nukaraju,

10 VSS members are cultivating 1 acre each.

Vanathala besu V

All members are cultivators.

Sarabahaiyya

6 families are affected.

Mata kamaraju

 There are no affected families

Kamadam Somalingam

7 families have cultivated 10 acres

Vanthala Rama Rao

There are people who have houses in RF and land in the VSS.

Pangi Vinod

There are 10 cultivators dependent on VSS land

Tambelu Ravinder

5 people have surrendered 25 acres of land to VSS. They are dependent entirely on that land.

Korra Madhava Rao

7 VSS members are cultivating 10 acres of land.

Poturi Linga murthy

2 families have 3 acres of land in VSS, they have other land for survival.

Tella Naiya

2 people are cultivating 4 acres in VSS, they also have land outside.

Pottur Appa Rao

No encroachments

Golluri Papa rao

9 members have encroached 45 acres of land in VSS

G.Ananda Rao

Only 1 member is having land in VSS.

Korra Nagaraju

No encroachments in VSS

Korra Nageshwara

All members are cultivating in VSS area, they are dependent on it.

Taggi Rama rao

People in 5 and 6 category

Korra subba Rao

7 members have surrendered 30 acres of land to VSS, they are now working with VSS members.

Jampa nuka raju

10 members have raised cashew plantation in VSS area. If any group based IGA, is taken up, they will leave the plantation.

Kella Achiyalu

2 Families have raised cashew plantation in VSS area. If any group based IGA, is taken up, they will leave the plantation.

Jampa Lowaraju

5 families cultivating podu in VSS area. If any group based IGA, is taken up, they will leave the area.

T.Achyutu

No podu areas

K.Yeshoda 

For affected persons, any group based activity should be taken for rehabilitation.

Kalyani, 

For affected persons, any group based activity should be taken for rehabilitation.

Mamidi Jagannaram

VSS members have voluntarily taken forest area for development.

Madumala papa rao

On request, forest department has shown alternate livelihood in the form of VSS.

K.Linga murthy

Jarila chitti babu

We have voluntarily surrendered the land , because we felt that VSS will benefit us.

Korra nandu

We have voluntarily surrendered the land , because we felt that VSS will benefit us.

 


Division: Srikakulam

Participant

Observation

Nimakka Laxman Rao

There are 20 families in our village, which live on head loading for livelihood.  We need goats and support for business.

Savara Duggaiah

We depend entirely on podu for livelihood. We may be provided goats and bullocks.

S. Totaiah

23 families are possessing podu lands. Provide loans for goats or business as alternate support

K. Suryanarayana, 

In our village 24 families are dependent on head loading. We want goats for livelihood.

 

Badana Ramaiah

Around 10 acres have been encroached by members, since there is no alternate livelihood. Kindly provide support to raise plantations.

Parasilli ganapathi

In contrast to the above proposal kindly provide us loan.

Jemmana Narayana

We are head loaders. Provide us good grafts for raising plantations.

P. Darma rao

From the past we are dependent on Podu, we do not have any other alternative. We should be given rights on that land.

K. Kurma rao

We will not leave the podu lands in our possession.

N. Shanta rao

There are head loaders and podu cultivators in our VSS. If Govt. provides any livelihood support they are ready to leave the land.

S. Sambru

We are dependent on podu from the past as, there is no other livelihood. Whatever schemes you propose , we are not going to leave the land.

J. Mokha lingam

20 families have lost livelihood due to formation of Saparaiguda VSS. They may be provided support under CFM.

K. Kurma Rao

If you provide rights to us everything is provided.

P.Durga rao

There are head loaders and podu cultivators in our VSS. If Govt. provides any livelihood support they are ready to leave the land.

R. Rama Rao

In our VSS, people have encroached RF for cultivation. Provide any alternate livelihood for them.

 

K. Rama Rao

M. Machhaiah

We are dependent on head loading from the past. We do not have any podu lands.

B. Bangaraiah

We have old podu, and we depend on head loading.

G. Rama Rao

We don’t have podu but, there is a cashew plantation raised by BC in VSS area.

Laleti Laxman Rao

I possess 25  cents podu land. I need a financial support for livelihood.

Kolaka ramulamma

I am a head loaderg. Provide financial support for milch cattle.

Palaka annapurnamma

I am a head loader. Provide financial support for dairy farm.

Kundani Krishna Rao

I possess podu  land . I need goats, cows or financial help.

Savaral Akkaiah

I am a head loader. Provide financial support for sheep.

Arika Shantamma

I possess podu land. Provide  financial help for dairy farm.

Gunjwada laxman rao

From the past, we are dependent on forest land, we will not leave it.

Agadhala Ekasamma

We are living inside RF, we cannot leave the resources there.

Kottur Somaiah

I am a head loader.  Kindly provide sheep or cows for livelihood.

 

Pedinti Pollaiah

I depend on podu and headloading for livelihood  and I need milch cattle, leaf plate making machines and agarbatthi industry.

Janni Dharma rao

I am a head loader. For livelihood dairy farm, sheep, poultry farm motors for agri wells should be given.

P. Achutar Rao

In encroached areas, fruit species may be raised. In outside areas, provide facilities for agriculture.

B. Appa Rao

We are doing podu because we don’t have any other land. Give us land.

A. Ganga Rao

Since we don’t have any other livelihood, we are dependent on podu, show some alternatives in the form of land or financial help.

 

Division: Vizianagaram

Participant

Observation

G. Lachaiah

8 families were practicing podu in our village prior to formation of VSS. In this land we have raised plantations from which we have some livelihood .In addition to this the 8 families may be given loans for sheep, leaf plate making ,and houses may be constructed for them under CFM.

Pothanapalli Chandar Rao

Due to drought conditions there is severe water problem in our village. Under CFM drinking water or bore facility may be provided to us. For those not having even a cent of land labor should be provided. Houses may be constructed for 9 families.

Thuneti

Venkat Rao

Prior to formation of VSS we were practicing podu. After VSS is formed we are earning livelihood by selling broomsticks. We want rehabilitation in the form of land for land 

Gemmala Ramu 

At the time of formation of VSS there were 25 families practicing podu. Presently they are selling broom sticks for living .As rehabilitation they want land equal to surrendered land and facilities like agri. implements and financial help for cultivating the land.    

Muvvala Manikyamma

 

 

At the time of formation of VSS there were 80 families practicing podu. Presently, 35 families are selling broom sticks for living .As rehabilitation they want land equal to surrendered land and facilities like agri .implements and financial help for cultivating the land.    

Doneru Chinnamma

Prior to formation of VSS 25 families were dependent on encroached lands which they have left after formation of VSS. Alternate livelihood may be provided for them.

Sebi Adayya

Prior to formation of VSS 18 families were dependent on encroached lands which they have left after formation of VSS. Alternate livelihood may be provided for them.

Meesala Seerelu

Prior to formation of VSS 30 families were dependent on encroached lands which they have left after formation of VSS. Alternate livelihood may be provided for them


 

Velega Chinnarao

Prior to formation of VSS 19 families were dependent on encroached lands which they have left after formation of VSS. Alternate livelihood may be provided for them

 

Members do not have livelihood as the lands they were cultivated included in VSS. For the NTFP available there are no marketing facilities

Solution: House construction, supply of Milch cattle, Cycles Tent house, and mike sets for livelihood and marketing facility for NTFP.

VSS is in need of roads community halls, bores, culverts, agricultural implements check dams and percolation tanks.

S Mohan

30 families were practicing podu .Due to formation of VSS the land is included in VSS. These people are presently struggling for livelihood by collecting dry twigs, small NTFP, and are getting insufficient  wages. Hence they may be provided land for cultivation, facilities for modern cultivation techniques and bank loans.

Mellika RajaRao

35 families were practicing podu .Due to formation of VSS the land is included in VSS. These people are presently struggling for livelihood by selling fuel wood  and are working for meager wages.

 Hence they may be provided land for cultivation, facilities for modern cultivation techniques and bank loans. 

G. Bosu 

There are no affected families in our village due to formation of VSS. But for livelihood support.

Sambangi Paramesu

There are 5 families cultivating inside RF and after formation of VSS in 1997 have lost the land to VSS. Further there are 12 families entirely dependent on forests. We have raised 15000 plants in 4 acres area but have left that land after formation of VSS.

K. Veeraiah

In this VSS there are 15 families who have no land including one crippled person. Also there are 10 families without house and 20 headloaders.

Y.Kesava Rao 

 If  NGO  comes to our village and convinces the people, they are willing to stop podu. But they doubt whether Government will extend help .

T.Vasudeva Rao

If everything  is implemented as discussed and decided in GO 13 consultations, we will stop doing podu

 

Division: Paderu

Participant.

Observation

G. Appala Swamy

11 families were living on podu cultivation prior to formation  of VSS. . Give us banjaru lands and loans for our livelihood.

B.Swamy

Even though we have lands, 13 families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. After VSS formation, we stopped podu cultivation. Give us banjaru lands  for our livelihood.

B. Gani

Before VSS formation, our 9 families are depending fuel wood from forest hills.  Provide us livelihood.

G. Buddu

Our 14 families are depending on 70 acres of forestlands for podu. If Rs.26000 for each family is provided for our business & livelihood, we will develop forests

V. Govindu

Before formation of VSS we were dependent on fuel wood from forest. We stopped this after formation of VSS. Save us with livelihood support for our 3 families.

V.Chetu

Our 6 families are possessing30 acres of podu lands. If Rs.18000 for each family is provided for business or  livelihood, we will develop forests.

K.Kannaiah

Even though we have lands, 5 families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. Give us loans for our livelihood, as pattas lands are not sufficient.

P.Somara

Prior to formation of VSS we were dependant on headloading. Presently we do not have any livelihood .Provide us livelihood, to feed our families.

K.Sonia

Prior to formation of VSS our 10 families were depending on podu. Provide us loans for our livelihood.

S. Padma

Even though we have lands, 9 families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. Give us loans for our livelihood, as pattas lands are not sufficient.

S. Bheemanna

Prior to formation of VSS our 10 families were depending on headloading. Provide us loans for our livelihood.

 

K. Ramanna

Our 5 families are depending on 15 acres of forestlands for podu. If Rs.15000 for each family is provided for our business/livelihood, we will develop forests

K. Baburao

Having pattas, depending on podu to meet our livelihood. After formation of VSS, stopped.  Give banjaru lands  to our 2families  for our livelihood

V. Moddu

Prior to formation of VSS our 3 families were depending on headloading. Provide us loans for our livelihood

S. Naarsingarao

Our 9 families are depending on 45 acres of podu lands  . If Rs.20000 for each family is provided for our business/ livelihood, we will develop forests

S. Mangla

Even though we have lands8 families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. Give us loans for our livelihood, as pattas lands are not sufficient

S. Pedda Bhim Naidu

Even though we have lands, 10families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. Give us loans for our livelihood, as pattas lands are not sufficient

P. Sanyasi, S/o. Lachu

  5 families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. Give us loans for our livelihood, as pattas lands are not sufficient

P. Parvathi, W/o. Gundanna

Prior to formation of VSS our 3 families were depending on headloading. Provide us loans for our livelihood

V. Veeranna, S/o. Sanchedi

Prior to formation of VSS we possessed podu land .Provide me loan for vegetable business for our livelihood.

Sobha Janakamma, W/o. Hari

Prior to formation of VSS we possessed podu land families Provide me loan for bangle business for our livelihood.

P.Pratap

Our 11 families are depending on 20 acres of forestlands for podu. If Rs.25000 for each family or two acres land  for each family is provided for our business/ livelihood, we will develop forests

K. Mukundu

Our 6 families are depending on 12 acres of hill forest lands for podu. Stopped after formation of VSS.  If loan is  provided for our 6 families for  livelihood, we will develop forests.

K. Hari

We 4 families, having patta lands, were doing podu on forest hills. Stopped on formation of VSS.


 

K. Padma

Prior to formation of VSS our 5 families were depending on headloading. Stopped after VSS formation.  Provide loan for our livelihood.

K. Anandarao

Prior to formation of VSS our 3 families were dependant on podu in forests Lost livelihood. Loans for livelihood may be provided. We will develop forests.

T. Lachanna

Even though we have lands, 3 families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. We are doing agriculture in patta lands.  Banjaru lands may be sanctioned.

B. Padma

Prior to formation of VSS our 4 families were dependant on podu in forests Lost livelihood. Loans for livelihood may be provided. We will develop forests.

S. Ramanna

Our 18 families are depending on 90 acres of forest lands for podu. If Rs.40000 for each family is provided for our business/livelihood, we will develop forests

G. Ramchender

Before formation of VSS we were meeting livelihood from fuel wood. Provide loans to our 11 families to feed us.

K. Berse,

Our 6 families are depending on 30 acres of forest lands for podu. If loan is provided for our families to do business we will meet our livelihood.

K. Sambu

Before formation of VSS we were meeting livelihood from forest fuel wood. Provide loans to our 3 families to feed us.

K. Subba Rao

We do not have lands .Dependant on podu. If 22 acres podu type banjar land  is allotted to the 8 families, we will make out living..

P. Sonnu

  We do not have lands. Dependant on podu. If loan of Rs.40000 per family is allotted to the 8 families, we will make out livelihood

S. Jattu

6 families dependent on 8 acres of forest lands for podu.  If 3 acres each land is allotted can earn our living

S. Sitaram

Even though we have lands, 2 families were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS. Providing loans for business to feed families as patta lands are insufficient.

K. Prahlad

Landless. Podu for livelihood by 6 families

G. Balanna

With own lands, doing podu for livelihood – 4 families. All are doing podu in 35 acres of forest land. Want financial help for K.Arjun for tailoring shop- Rs.25,000. Want financial help to raising more income generating species and  fruit trees in podu lands to develop financially.

V. Koche

Before VSS, our 3 families doing podu.  Survival is difficult now. If financial help is given, we will do business to feed our families.

V. Moddu

Even though I have lands, I am doing podu. If financial help is given, I will   feed my family.

P. Ambati

Before formation of VSS, our 6 landless  families were doing podu at foots of hill forests Survival is difficult now. If financial help is given, we will do business to feed our families.

V. Kosaraju

Before formation of VSS, our   families were taking fuel from forest for livelihood.  Stopped now. If financial help is given, we will do business to feed our families

K. Jagabandhu

Before VSS, we were doing podu in forests. Survival is difficult now. If financial help is given, we will do business to feed our families.

G. Appanna

Even though we have lands, we were doing podu cultivation before formation of VSS.

G. Gangadhar

Before formation of VSS, families were doing podu in forests. Survival is difficult now. If financial help is given, we will   feed our families.

B. Neelakantam

15 members doing podu in 30 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial helps for business will help for livelihood.

M. Gopal

7 members doing podu in 21 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial help for business will help for livelihood.

M. Bheemanna

5 families doing podu in 10 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial help for business will help for livelihood.

K. Pollu

   Doing podu for dependence though we 3 families have little land. Required tailoring machines and financial help for business.

K. Rama Rao

23 members doing podu in 40 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial help for business will help for livelihood

J. Murali

10 members doing podu in 30 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial help for business will help for livelihood

P.Pollu

23members doing podu in 45 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or permission to raise coffee in VSS with Rs.25,000/- financial help   for livelihood  .

P.Gurumurthy

31 families are doing podu, even after having patta lands. Extend support by providing 2 acres land with permission to raise coffee and Rs. 20,000 Or Providing small scale industry with jobs to us.

K. Modhu

Doing podu in 12 acres forest lands to feed 7 families. Extend support by providing 2 acres land and with permission to raise coffee and 20,000 financial help.  Providing small scale industry with jobs to us will also help.

K. Sanyasi

9 members doing podu in 33 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial help for business will help for livelihood.

K. Dobulu

7members doing podu in 15 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial help for business will help for livelihood.

K. Appalaswami

21 members doing podu in 30 acres forest lands. 2 acres banjaru each or Rs.25,000/- financial help for business will help for livelihood.

G. Neelamma

We are doing podu in 14 acres forest lands to feed 7 families. Help us by providing 2 acres each  with permission to raise coffee and 25,000 financial help for our livelihood.  

S. Jinnu

We are doing podu in 12 acres forest lands to feed 6 families. Help us by providing 2 acres each  with permission to raise coffee and 25,000 financial help for our livelihood

T. Moddu

We are doing podu in 4 acres forest lands to feed 4 families. Help us by providing 2 acres each  with permission to raise coffee and 25,000 financial help for our livelihood

G. Kondala Rao

We are doing podu in 13 acres forest lands to feed 3 families. Help us by providing 2 acres each  with permission to raise coffee and 25,000 financial help for our livelihood

V. Jagannadham

We are doing podu in 20acres forest lands to feed 4 families. Help us by providing 2 acres banjar each  or 25,000 financial help for our livelihood .

K. Chondor

We are doing podu in25 acres forest lands to feed 11 families. Help us by providing 2 acres each or 25,000 financial help for our livelihood

K. Purushotham

We are doing podu in 10acres forest lands to feed 5 families. Help us by providing 2 acres  banjaru or 25,000 financial help will help us do business for  livelihood.  

V. Soma

 We are doing podu in 16acres forest lands to feed 8 families. Help us by providing 2 acres  banjaru or 25,000 financial help will help us do business for  livelihood.  

K. Srinath

We do not have any land. Doing podu in 8 acres for 4 families. We request you for loans for business, cattle and goats and banjar lands.

P. Protimma

We 5 families are depending on podu for  livelihood. We have small piece of land. We request you for financial help for business, and machines for addakula stitching, cloth stitching etc;

P. Chittanna

We 6 families are feeding our  families by selling  fuel wood from forests from forest. We request for loans for business cattle and for kirana shop and banjar lands  for livelihood.

K. Satrughnu

1. no lands. Depended on podu – 5 acres – lost livelihood – loan for business, sanction of banjar lands and loan for growing vegetables;

2. some lands doing podu for livelihood. Loan for business,   sanction of banjar lands

3. sanction of banjaru lands and loan for business.

G. Nageswara

. 1. no lands. Depended on podu –  – lost livelihood – loan for business

 

S. Mohana Rao

Lost livelihood due to stopping of podu in forest lands – 38 families in 40 acres. Loans for business and loans for growing allam and pasupu.

K. Sitaram

Own lands not sufficient, depending on podu in forests. 20 families.  Sanction of loan for addakula stitching machines.

 

M. Muddu

Depending on fuel and forest produce. 5 families. Sanction of banjaru lands for livelihood and loans for cattle( for milk business)

V. Chitan, S/o. Lachanna

1. Podu dependent families: 15 families for  15 acres of forest lands.

 

P. Mukta, W/o. Gundanna

2. Podu dependent families having own lands:    4 families

3.dependents on fuel and usufruct : 5 families

 

Requests: those totally dependent on podu: loans for business, lands for landless. 

G. Dombu,

B. Kamsula

Landless doing podu – 20 members in 35 acres: loan for business; sanction of banjar lands, loan for growing vegetables and for women loan for addakula stitching machines.

G.Arjun

Some land but doing podu for livelihood – lost – sanction of banjaru lands

G.Tellamma

Depended on fuel from forest lands and forest produce; loan for business, sanction of banjaru lands and loan for growing vegetables.

G.Vasudev

No lands doing podu in forest lands 3 families in 4 acres. Loans for business, loans for kirana and addakula stitching machine. Some lands but doing podu in forests for livelihood. Sanction of banjaru lands. Depending on fuel and forest produce. Loans for business, loans for goats (and for women) addakula stitching machines

G. Venkata and K. Appalamma

No lands 10 families    Loans for business, sanction of banjaru lands ;  loans for growing allam and pasupu. Some lands -  but doing podu in forests for livelihood. Loans for business and loans for addakula machines.

Depending on fuel and forest produce. Loans for business, sanction of banjaru lands.

K. Chander and K. Sonnu

26 members landless doing podu in 25 acres – for livelihood loans for business, sanction of banjar lands and for women stitching machines.

G. Guruvaiah

Some land doing podu 3 families lost livelihood – loans for business, sanction of banjaru lands and for women for addakula stitching machines.

R. Balaji

Depending on fuel and forest produce 2 families.  Loans for business and sanction of banjaru lands.

P. Bheemanna and D. Tulasi

9 families are landless depending on podu in forests.  Loans for business, sanction of banjaru lands and loans for growing vegetables and for women to acquire addakula stitching machines.

P. Appalaswamy

Some land but depending on podu in forests 5 families lost livelihood – loans for business, stitching machines for woken and sanction of banjaru lands.

P.Rammurthy

Depending on fuel and forest produce – 7families – loans for business, sanction of banjaru lands and loans for growing vegetables.

S.Rambabu and Smt.A.Appallamma

Landless – doing podu 16 families lost livelihood – loans for business, sanction of banjaru lands and loans for growing vegetables and for woken addakula stitching machines.

V.Madhu

Some lands – depending on podu 19 families lost livelihood – loans for business sanction of banjaru lands and for women stitching machines.

T.Valubabu

Depending on fuel and forest produce 11 families – loans for business sanction of banjaru lands and loans for growing vegetables.

Sonia Subba Rao

We are cultivating few acres of podu land as we do not have any other means for survival. Provide us financial help for alternate livelihood.

 Killo Bheemanna

 I am doing podu inside RF, though I am having land as my land is insufficient.

Pedakapu Varalamma

 

 We are cultivating few acres of podu lands, but presently working as agricultural labour.  Provide financial help for alternate livelihood.

Opinions expressed in the State level meeting:

Sl. No.

Name of the Participant

 

Observation

Time

1

Sarvasri

Ravi Pragada, NGO, Samata

The poor people work for the land.  Since the start of forest administration, the conflict with  the Department has started.   As per the paper published, dated 10.12.2002, about  3413  Sq. Km of forest area is under occupation which constitutes < 5%  of the entire  land/ earth.  As per land utilization records,  50 to 70%  of the land with Forest Department is in agency areas, 17%  Agriculture,  Irrigated land 6%,  .  The Tribal population has increased by 30% and  as per the feed-back  the tribals  are not ready  to part with the Podu land.                            

3.30 PM

2

Sidam Shambu of Utnoor Range./ Adilabad dist.

In Adilabad division, 60% of the forest land is under encroached.  The R & R Policy  Revision was discussed at Range and Division levels. The Forest land is encroached by the landless whose entire livelihood  is dependent on this  and also encroached by the people having lands outside the forests.  Under R & R Policy,  rehabilitation should be  made  to the landless only.  Similarly  a decision has to be taken  about the persons, who are landless  and  have not occupied  any forest land.  For the encroached lands, the Government has provided Electricity, Borewell etc  and  if shifted  outside the forests, will the government  provide all these facilities.  The people should be made aware  that  by raising plantations they get more revenue.

3.32 PM

3

Chairperson/ Gokavaram VSS/Kakinada Division.

In  Yelleshwaram  Constituency  many landless people  were carrying out Podu  and  also  earning their livelihood by selling dead and dry trees as  fuel wood.   I have personally discussed with the concerned forest officials  for providing alternate  income generation to these people.  About 2500 acres  of Cashew Plantations, was raised by them  in vacant protected forest lands.  But till  now  no Pattas   are given to them.  The rehabilitation policy should be for landless and also to the people having very meager land  as  the productivity is very low, due to failure of rains/ drought. 

3.38 PM

4

CCF(CFM)

The CCF (CFM) has expressed  to clearly  say what type of rehabilitation is needed for those  who are voluntarily giving up the Podu areas to the VSS. The idea is not  to forcibly stop Podu in forest areas or evict  them. 

3.45 PM


 

5

S. Subrahmanyam. Chairperson, Punganur./ Chittoor

In VSS areas , if  grazing by cattle and sheep  is stopped  the members have to be  compensated  by providing alternate resources. 

3.47 PM

6

 Omkar Singh, IFS, CCF.

The  Joint survey of encroached lands is under progress and after completion of this exercise  the total forest area under encroachment  will be known  and as per records 40% of the encroached area  is under  VSS.  Based upon the date,  we have to find out  in how many VSS there is encroachment  and  also the number of people  who  have encroached.    The details of pre  and post 1980 encroachments  should be clearly made available, so that   they can be dealt separately by adopting different packages.  The amount of financial assistance,  credit availability etc. should be  informed  to the VSS members initially.  The different issues  have to be discussed point –wise  as was  done  in case of incremental  growth.

3.50 PM

7

Prl. CCF.

The Prl. CCF.  has clarified the participants that,  the issue under discussion is  that,  if a person  voluntarily  agrees  to include  Podu area in VSS  what  kind of rehabilitation  he can be  given  and  alternate sources of income  that  may be provided.

3.54

8

Murlikrishnam Naidu. Atmakur/ Nellore district

The Mango  and other fruit bearing species are planted  in the forest land  and  whether  they are  eligible for the returns.

3.56 PM

9

 Dhanuja, NGO  Ananthapur.

As per our survey in about 879 acres of encroached land under Bukkapatnam VSS,  plantations were raised in JFM under VSS as per voluntarily agreement of the   encroachers.  But  they were not called for  the  R & R policy meeting  held at Range  and now  the persons  who are  SC and ST and who have given these lands to VSS are asking  about  their rehabilitation.

3.53 PM

10

Krishna Rao, Chairperson.

 The people are against  giving  the Podu land to the VSS.  In some places, the people  from other States have also encroached the forest land  and  what  kind of policy is planned for them. 

3.57 PM

11

Sowmitri, NGO

In Vizag   about 37,000  ha. of encroached  area is included  under  VSS and was published as a success story.  The World Bank  considering it as a  loss of livelihood  has decided  for providing compensation package and hence  R & R policy is included in CFM.  As per the  survey of the discussions held at  Range level  and Division level about 833 families have agreed to voluntarily give Podu lands to VSS whereas 803 families  have  declined  to part with  Podu lands as they will be loosing their livelihood.   The World Bank has also decided  to rehabilitate the  persons   who have  agreed to part the Podu areas  in the VSS and plantations were raised under JFM.  The rehabilitation  is to be taken up  as a group  based activity  and not  by giving goats /sheep / cattle etc.  by deciding the extent of effective    rehabilitation.  Productive asset  building  and income generation  should be aimed.  For the persons  effected under JFM, the monitoring mechanism by way of giving technical advise  for the next two years involving all the line departments  to be developed  to see that  the  compensation is effectively utilized. In CFM   do not  evict  people   and  repeat  what was done under JFM.   The  pre and post  1980 encroachments are to be  clearly defined  and  R & R policy to be implemented.  The Government off India, during October, 2002 has given certain guidelines  for rehabilitation  and  has also given  instructions  to take up the survey of encroachments.

4.02

12

Amrutha Rao, Ambedkarnagar VSS, Jannaram

At the  consultation meetings held   at Range/ Division level  , the  Kolamguda   VSS  members  have expressed that  they will leave  all the encroached lands and houses to the VSS, provided,  they are  rehabilitated on  an area of 20 to 30  acres of land  along with development activities.  Some of them have expressed that   they will give half of the encroached area to the VSS  if  the land  under their possession is developed.

4.08

13

Sri.Madhusudan Rao, IFS. CF (Procurement)

In  Tiryani Range, the ITDA officials  have taken up rehabilitation of Kolams  outside the forest area by providing them housing,  raising horticulture etc.   The Kolams  hardly  stayed  for one year and during the next monsoon  season  they have left this place and settled   in still far interior forest area.   Therefore the tribal affinity  towards the forests has to be understood.  It is not clear  as to how  many tribal families will come forward to give  the Podu lands to the VSS  voluntarily.   The ITDA   has  taken up  a process  of consolidation of areas  for improving productivity   and  a similar  process  has to be taken up.   The problems and customs  are different  in  different areas  and  a region –wise packages have to be developed.

4.10

14

Prl. Secretary. EFS&T.

In JFM   some  encroached  area is brought under VSS   and  we have to devise a policy  on rehabilitation.

4.16 PM

15

Satya Srinivas.

The  R & R Policy is different from R & R Action plan. One package for the entire  state  is not advisable.  The funds  under R & R Policy are to be allotted to the VSS  and  thereafter  the works are to be taken up in VSS. 

4.19 PM

16

Narsimhalu, ACF

After  conducting R &R policy meeting at Range and Division level  new encroachments have started  with an intention  that they will get the compensation  for encroached forest area.

4.22 PM

17

Prl. Secretary, EFS&T.

The compensation / rehabilitation  is an individual activity.  Where as VSS is a community activity and we are imposing  the  community  on the individuals.  As per the data about 46,000 families  have voluntarily  given encroached lands to the VSS  under JFM.  A survey will be done to assess the  quantum of  compensation  required under R &R policy  at individual level.

4.25 PM

18

CCF (CFM)

During the preparation of Micro plans  the names of the encroachers who have  agreed to voluntarily  give  the Podu lands  to the VSS  and  the kind of compensation package  they wish  to have  will be included.  It is to be discussed during this meeting as to  what kind of rehabilitation    packages  are   needed .The compensation  is  only to the VSS  members.  In case of large encroachments  the  rehabilitation will be in the form of group based   economic activities and  if the encroachments are  less  individual income generating  activities will be taken up.

4.27 PM

19

Surya Kumari, NGO, Centre for people’s forestry.

In one  of the meetings  on R & R policy at Adilabad, the people  have expressed to voluntarily give encroached lands to the VSS.  The people who are having land outside the forests should also be provided  compensation  in case  they handover the encroached land to the VSS.  The rehabilitation should be   as a group based activity   and  should clearly define what an individual gets  in a group. 

4.34 PM

20.

Padmanabham, IFS, C.F. SF. Vijayawada.

The  tribals  of Paderu  are ready  to give the  encroached areas  to the VSS  voluntarily. As  most of these areas    are hilly  regions  with  sloping lands.  The condition  they have imposed  is that, the  VSS  should raise  silver  oak  plantations on these lands and they should be permitted to raise coffee  underneath  the silver oak.

4.36 PM

21

Dhanunjaya Rao FRO. Vizag.

In some of the VSS  due to encroachment by two or three families, the CFM  is not implemented.  The VSS members  are  complaining  against this  and  requesting   not to suffer  entire  village for the sake of 2/ 3 encroachers.  They have requested for  providing rehabilitation  package to these people , so that CFM can be implemented.  Due to R &R Policy  meetings   some of the persons  who have abandoned  old Podu areas  are now claiming the same  for compensation.  The rehabilitation should only be provided  to  the  persons  who are in possession  of  Podu areas as on date. 

4.39 PM

22

Sowmitri, NGO

In some of the Range level meetings on R &R policy  the  members have expressed that if they give the Podu areas to the VSS, they have live like  labour  as their forefathers.   In Paderu about 2,406  families  are  involved in Podu cultivation and  they  are not willing  to  give these areas to the VSS.  Hence  do not evict  them in the name of CFM.

4.45

23

CCF(CFM)

As per the   G.O. , the CFM  is not for eviction and  none of the  members  will be forced  for any eviction. 

4.50 PM

24

C.F. Vizag.

In some VSS , due to encroachment  by two or three  persons, the micro plans are not prepared.   Under R & R policy  these persons are to be  provided  individual rehabilitation  packages.  But  in forestry sector, the individual benefits/ packages  will create problems.

4.52.

25.

DFO. Adilabad

In Adilabad division,  about 56,000 ha of forest area is under encroached in different VSS.  The Micro plans are not prepared  for the VSS  having encroachments, the NGOs and the VSS members are requesting to write micro-plans  by not considering the encroachers as VSS members.

4.54 PM.

26

Sri R.G. Kalaghatgi, IFS. C.F.(MIS).

The Forest Department  does not have much experience in  rehabilitation  schemes.  Therefore  the R & R Policy implementation under CFM  may be given to ITDA.   The   meaning of term  eviction  is not clear.   If a person  grows silver oak in Podu areas,  of Paderu division  and  by  resolution  of VSS, GB  if  the entire usufructs  are given to  him, is it also called a eviction?.  A committee has to be set up whether any eviction is involved / done   and the issue of  some of the persons having lands  outside the R.F. is also to be  discussed.

4.57 PM

27.

M. Bullaiah, IFS .C.F. Adilabad.

In Adilabad district, 96,000 ha of forest area is under encroachments.   In the joint survey  there is much pressure to  include the encroachments as  pre 1980.   The VSS  members  in most of the meetings on explaining them  the  quantum and value of usufructs, they  inspite of understanding the same  are asking for  their livelihood for that  day.  All the VSS  during the  meetings are requesting for starting   CFM works.  Therefore pending rehabilitation we can start CFM works.  There is also a danger of fresh encroachments if compensation is paid to encroachers and we may lose some more forest areas. 

5.02 PM

28

Sri R.G. Kalaghatgi, IFS

C.F.(MIS)

Since it is decided to revise R & R policy, the World Bank may now agree to take up works / preparation of micro plans in VSS having encroachments.    Necessary proposals in this regard may be made.

5.07 PM

 

Remarks by Panel Members:

       Sri Vittal Rajan,   NGO, has opined that the encroachments should be considered as pre 1980, 1980   and after 2000.  I appreciate the several assurances given by the Forest Department that there will be no forcible eviction and   only   those coming voluntarily will be considered.  The CFM is important imaginative step   for helping tribals and to correct mistakes done by the Britishers.  The encroached areas included under JFM during 1980- 2002 are to be looked case after case and a blanket package should not be made.  The officials are presently interested not only on the environment but also human equipment.   As per the report   of R & R consultation meeting held at Range/ Division meetings, it is seen that several have come forward to give Podu areas to the VSS provided they are rehabilitated.   The CFM has to be protected and the people are to be taken in to confidence, the NGOs   have to work in close liason with Forest Department.

 

       Smt. Urmila Pingle, NGO has clarified that a cluster/ federation involving all the VSS is to be formed to strengthen the VSS into an autonomous body.   Eviction should not be taken up.

       Sri Prem Chandra Reddy, IAS, Director, Tribal Welfare, opined that the assurance of the Forest Department that none of them will be evicted forcibly under C.F.M. is well appreciated.  Under JFM, the livelihood loss is found to be more and rehabilitation has to be done.   As per the discussions held, there will be no such loss of livelihood under CFM.  Under rehabilitation both the individual as well as group based activities are to be taken up depending upon the circumstances and issues.  I welcome the proposals of giving the work of R & R. to ITDA or Tribal Welfare.  The levels of rehabilitation and adequacy are to be established so that it will be easy for the implementing agency.  At present most of the rehabilitations are land based schemes.   The VSS is a very large group consisting   200 to 400 members, so participation may not be effective.    The VSS may be divided in to sub-groups on some basis, so that participation levels may increase. 

       The Prl. C.C.F. has concluded the consultation meetings on revision of R & R policy by expressing that   development of forests huge sustainable income should be made available to the VSS. 

Issues deliberated and recommendations: Issues that were deliberated during the stakeholders workshops held during preparation of A P Community Forest Management Project and the ones during April to August 2003 are detailed below. A number of issues, which were deliberated upon during the stakeholders’ workshops, and recommendations made.  Some of the important issues relevant to R&R and Tribal Development discussed and recommendations made are given below: 

 

Issue: Shifting Cultivation and Encroachments: Regarding shifting cultivation, following issues emerged:

 

 

a.       Shifting cultivation is a major agricultural practice in the tribal belt of the State, especially in North Coastal districts and in Adilabad.  The practice has by now become more or less settled cultivation. 

b.      Discouraging  through legal action has failed to stop the practice.

c.       Since it is an issue dealing with livelihood especially in tribal belt, not all the cultivators may be willing to relinquish such cultivations. At best they may relinquish part of land encroached.

d.      There are cases wherein those who have encroached forestlands also have their own private lands.

e.       In non-tribal areas, such encroachments have been made even by big and well to do farmers.

f.        Providing R& R package to those who have encroached forestlands may encourage those who have not encroached such lands earlier to resort to encroaching now.

g.       Providing R&R package to those having land outside the VSS areas in addition to encroached land in VSS area who relinquish lands in VSS areas and not taking up CFM activities in VSSs where those who have encroached forest lands do not relinquish encroachments due to livelihood needs will deprive such landless villagers while doubly benefiting landed people. This widens the gap between landed and the landless.

 

Recommendation:

It was generally felt that the shifting cultivation and the encroachment into the forest for cultivation are not good practices and they needed to be discouraged.   While doing so, it is was felt that this is an issue dealing with the livelihood of the poor and therefore needs a holistic approach.  It was felt necessary to widen the livelihood base of these people through introducing various suitable alternate income-generating activities and upgrading their skills, including promotion of improved agricultural practices on private lands to restore the economic well being of the affected families.

There are 5 types of families who are normally affected when dealing with encroachment into forest lands for cultivation.  The types of the families likely to be affected and relief measures suggested are:

·        1. Families with landholding outside project losing encroached land:

·        Relief measure suggested :- Assistance to improve farming in landholding outside project area through irrigation, improved farm inputs, and other agriculture support  or the   affected families will be provided support, if opted, to take up income generation activities.

2.      Families entirely dependent on encroached land

·            Relief measure suggested:- Land for land (equal extent of land lost), where ever government revenue or ceiling surplus land is available and acceptable. Such families will be assisted to improve farming by providing farm inputs, and other agriculture support and access to agricultural credit or affected families can be provided support, if opted, to take up   income generation activities

3. Families having other sources of income

·        Relief measures suggested:- Affected families will be provided  financial support to take up additional income generation activities

4. Families losing housing

·  Relief measures suggested:- Allow the salvage material to be carried to the new site. Provide alternate site or cash in lieu of it. Housing under weaker section housing scheme or a housing construction grant. Provide for transport for carrying household salvaged material.

 

 

5. Families not willing to vacate encroached lands

·        Exclude such lands from VSS limits.

 

            

Issue: Capacity Building of the VSS Members, Forest Staff and NGOs.

In all the workshops there was a general feeling that the capacity of the forest staff, VSS members and NGOs Should be improved for the proper and effective management of the VSS.

Recommendation:

Training programmes in raising medicinal plants, nurseries, estimating the potential of forest produce and marketing, grafting of other and other species, various silvicultural operations, soil and moisture conservation works, accounting procedures of the VSS, value addition and storage practices of the NTFP and medicinal plants etc., are to be organized to build up the capacities of the VSS members, forest staff and the NGOs.  In addition to the centralized training programs in the A.P. Forest academy at Dullapalli, training programs may be organized in the circles and the districts also. Exposure trips to other successful VSS both within the State and outside the state may also being organized. Videotapes of the successful V. S. S. may be shown in other V. S. S. for inspiration.

 

Issue: Landless VSS members resorting to head loading as a means of livelihood: It came out that landless members of VSSs resort to cutting dried firewood and faggot wood. Even some villagers of nearby villages also depend on such activity. This impacts on protection of forests and results in degradation of biodiversity and forest resources.

 

Recommendation: It was decided that such families should be identified and special livelihood packages should be developed for their amelioration. If required institutional finance should be linked to make these schemes viable.

 

Annexure III

Legend

Reporting arrangement

Linkage

 
Flow chart depicting the linkages in Planning, Implementation and Monitoring System of the Resettlement Action Plan (EAG is missing)

                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

 

Annex IV

Grievance Redress Mechanism and Coordination arrangements

At Village level:

a)      For each V.S.S. there is an Advisory Council comprising of the concerned Forest Section Officer, Forest Beat Officer or Assistant Beat Officer, the Panchayat Sarpanch, representative of the Village Tribal Development Agency in scheduled areas (to be nominated by the ITDA), the Village Administrative Officer, the NGO actively involved in assisting the V.S.S., and Village School Headmaster/Headmistress.

b)      The Panchayat Sarpanch shall chair the advisory council meetings. If for any reason he / she is unable to attend the meeting the Forest Section Officer shall preside over.

c)      Constitution of the advisory body shall be the responsibility of the Forest Range Officer.

d)      Convening meetings of the Advisory Council shall be the responsibility of the Forest Section Officer. Advisory council meetings should be held to facilitate their timely input into micro-plan and annual plan preparation and evaluation and also to coordinate the activities of other departments at V.S.S. level.

e)       The Advisory Council will review micro-plans and annual plans and advise the V.S.S. on strategies and available resources for implementing them.

f)        The advisory council shall meet as often as required.

 

At District level:

A District Forestry Committee has the following; 

  1. District Collector (Chairman)
  2. Project Director District Rural Development Agency (Member)
  3. Project Officer Integrated Tribal Development Agency (Member)
  4. Representative of GCC at District level (Member)
  5. District Tribal Welfare Officer (Member)
  6. Executive Director Dist. S.C.S.C. Society (Member)
  7. Joint Director Agriculture (Member)
  8. Joint Director Animal Husbandry (Member)
  9. All the Divisional Forest Officers in the district (Member)
  10. Three NGOs (including at least one Woman delegate) to be nominated by the AP NGOs Committee on CFM (Members)
  11. 5 V.S.S. members nominated by the district collector (at least 3 members shall be women) (Members)

Head quarters Divisional Forest Officer will be the convener. The tenure of the nominated members shall be one year.

The responsibilities of the District Forest Committee will be as follows;

(a)      The District Forestry Committee shall review implementation of Community Forest Management and provide direction to the Forest Department and other departments in the holistic development of villages and hamlets where VSS are operating and in adjacent villages and hamlets that may be affected by the implementation of CFM.

(b)     The committee shall also ensure that there are no duplication of efforts by the various departments.

(c)      The District Forest Committee shall convey any observations or concerns that require state-level intervention to the State Level Forest Committee.

(d)     The District Forestry Committee shall meet at least once in three months.

(e)      The District Forestry Committee shall have powers to remove any member of the Managing Committee from the Managing Committee who is convicted of Offence(s) under any of the Forest Acts and Rules there under and / or any other Offence punishable under any law, or to cancel recognition any Vana Samrakshana Samithi majority of whose members are convicted of having committed Offence(s) under any of the Forest Acts and Rules there under and / or convicted of any other Offence(s) punishable under any law. The District Forestry Committee shall have powers to cancel recognition to any V.S.S. which does not function effectively. The decision of the District Forest Committee shall be final.

 

At the ITDA level

At ITDA level, the committee will have the following constitution:

  1. Project Officer ITDA (Chairman)  
  2. Two NGOs (at least one shall be woman) Member (To be nominated by the C. F.)
  3. Ten V.S.S. members (at least four shall be women) Member (To be nominated by the C.F.)
  4. GCC Representative (  Member)
  5. Sub DFO/ DFO at ITDA headquarters (Member Convener)

This committee is responsible for:

a.       Review the implementation of C.F.M activities

b.      Coordinate the activities of the various Government departments to ensure holistic development and avoid duplication of works.

c.       Resolve inter V.S.S. conflicts and conflicts between the V.S.S. and non V.S.S. issues.

d.      The committee shall meet once in three months.

At Forest Division level:

1. Divisional Forest Officer (Chairman)

2. One representatives each from Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, Rural development (DRDA), Tribal Welfare, ITDA, Social Welfare, District S.C. Society, GCC, NEDCAP (Members)

3. Three NGOs (Members)

4. 5 VSS chairpersons, (at least 3 women) (Members

    This committee is responsible for:

a.       This committee shall meet every month and monitor functioning of VSS;

b.      Implementation of  decisions taken in the District Forestry Committee and other meetings;

c.       Ensure coordination of all concerned departments and agencies for proper functioning of VSS.

 

At State Level:

The State level committee has the following constitution. It coordinates the Community Forest Management.

  1. Prl. Secretary Environment, Forests, Science and Technology Department (Chairman)
  2. Pr. Secretary Social Welfare or his nominee (Member)
  3. Sec. Panchayat Raj and Rural Development (Member)
  4. Managing Director A.P.F.D.C. (Member)
  5. Commissioner Tribal Welfare    (Member)
  6. Director Animal Husbandry Department (Member)
  7. Commissioner Agriculture Department (Member)
  8. Managing Director G.C.C. (Member)
  9. Nominee of Secretary Finance (Member)
  10. Director Women and Child Welfare (    Member)
  11. NGOs 2 Nos.  (nominated by the AP NGOs Committee on PFM) (Members)
  12. Representative of Ministry of Environment and Forests (GOI)(Member)
  13. Prl. Chief Conservator of Forests (Member Convener)

 

Independent Advisory Group at state level:

The independent advisory group will comprise five members to be nominated by Government of Andhra Pradesh. These members will be eminent persons from the fields of law, judiciary, social work, academics, forestry etc. Minimum of one member shall be from legal background and one from forestry background. The Project Director of the A.P. Community Forest Management will be its convener.  Tenure of the members of this advisory group will be two years from the date of nomination The Independent Advisory Group will be serviced by the Project Monitoring Unit of the A. P. Community Forest Management Project.

Role and responsibilities of the Independent Advisory Group:

  1. The Independent Advisory Group will examine complaints relating to Resettlement Action Plan that are received by it or brought to its notice and advice the Government of Andhra Pradesh and the Forest Department of Andhra Pradesh on remedial measures as necessary for redressal of any grievances.
  2. The Independent Advisory Group will meet as frequently as required (at least once in 3 months), to advice the Government of Andhra Pradesh and the Forest Department of Andhra Pradesh on implementation of Resettlement Action Plan. .
  3. It may undertake field visits to enquire into complaints relating to Resettlement Action Plan.

It may refer the complaints received by it to District/Division level Forestry Committees specified in the Grievance redressal mechanism detailed in the Resettlement Action Plan prepared in accordance with the Rehabilitation and Resettlement Policy issued by the Government of Andhra Pradesh in G.O. Ms. No. 10 EFS&T (For III) Department Dt. 5.2.2002 as modified from time to time.
Annex V: List of Monitoring indicators

Indicators

Frequency

Method to follow

Agency Responsible

Process of RAP preparation

1. SIA completed and RAPs prepared (No. of VSS)

 

 

2. RAPs approved by DFO (No.)

 

Quarterly

 

Quarterly

 

Reports from FSO and NGO/CO

Reports from FSO and NGO/CO

 

SDS and DFO

 

SDS and DFO

Physical

1.  Identifying encroached lands within VSS area.

 

2.  No. of encroachers  identified

 

 

3. Encroachers surrendering land (No)

 

 

 

4. PAFs assisted by type of entitlements (No.)

 

5. PAFs identified for IG Activities (No.) by type of IG

 

6. PAFs receiving institutional credit (No)

 

7. PAFs under Govt. schemes (by type) (No.)

 

8. PAFs receiving rehabilitation grant (No)

 

9. Assets (by type) if any acquired and compensated

 

10.  PAFs Received Training (no.)

 

11. PAFs establishing IG activities

 

Annually

 

 

Annually

 

 

Monthly

 

 

 

 

Monthly

 

 

Monthly

 

 

Monthly

 

 

Monthly

 

 

Monthly

 

 

Monthly

 

Quarterly

 

 

 

 

Reports from VSS/FBO/FSO and NGO/CO

Reports from VSS/FBO/FSO and NGO/CO

Reports from VSS/FBO/FSO and NGO/CO

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

-do-

 

SDS/DFO

 

 

SDS/DFO

 

 

SDS/DFO and External M&E agency ( to report on their visits)

-do-

 

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

 

-do-

 

-do-

 


 

Financial (Rs.)

1. R&R assistance provided in terms of type of entitlement

 

2. Rehabilitation grant for  IG activity

 

3. Bank loans arranged 

Training expenses

 

Monthly

 

 

 

Monthly

 

 

Quarterly

 

 

Reports from VSS/FBO/FSO

 

 

Reports from VSS/FBO/FSO

 

Reports from VSS/FBO/FSO

 

 

 

 

 

SDS/DFO and External M&E agency ( to report on their visit)

 -do-